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Construction of a three-dimensional interactive model of the skull base and cranial nerves.
Neurosurgery. 2007 May; 60(5):901-10; discussion 901-10.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The goal was to develop an interactive three-dimensional (3-D) computerized anatomic model of the skull base for teaching microneurosurgical anatomy and for operative planning.

METHODS

The 3-D model was constructed using commercially available software (Maya 6.0 Unlimited; Alias Systems Corp., Delaware, MD), a personal computer, four cranial specimens, and six dry bones. Photographs from at least two angles of the superior and lateral views were imported to the 3-D software. Many photographs were needed to produce the model in anatomically complex areas. Careful dissection was needed to expose important structures in the two views. Landmarks, including foramen, bone, and dura mater, were used as reference points.

RESULTS

The 3-D model of the skull base and related structures was constructed using more than 300,000 remodeled polygons. The model can be viewed from any angle. It can be rotated 360 degrees in any plane using any structure as the focal point of rotation. The model can be reduced or enlarged using the zoom function. Variable transparencies could be assigned to any structures so that the structures at any level can be seen. Anatomic labels can be attached to the structures in the 3-D model for educational purposes.

CONCLUSION

This computer-generated 3-D model can be observed and studied repeatedly without the time limitations and stresses imposed by surgery. This model may offer the potential to create interactive surgical exercises useful in evaluating multiple surgical routes to specific target areas in the skull base.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17460526

Citation

Kakizawa, Yukinari, et al. "Construction of a Three-dimensional Interactive Model of the Skull Base and Cranial Nerves." Neurosurgery, vol. 60, no. 5, 2007, pp. 901-10; discussion 901-10.
Kakizawa Y, Hongo K, Rhoton AL. Construction of a three-dimensional interactive model of the skull base and cranial nerves. Neurosurgery. 2007;60(5):901-10; discussion 901-10.
Kakizawa, Y., Hongo, K., & Rhoton, A. L. (2007). Construction of a three-dimensional interactive model of the skull base and cranial nerves. Neurosurgery, 60(5), 901-10; discussion 901-10.
Kakizawa Y, Hongo K, Rhoton AL. Construction of a Three-dimensional Interactive Model of the Skull Base and Cranial Nerves. Neurosurgery. 2007;60(5):901-10; discussion 901-10. PubMed PMID: 17460526.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Construction of a three-dimensional interactive model of the skull base and cranial nerves. AU - Kakizawa,Yukinari, AU - Hongo,Kazuhiro, AU - Rhoton,Albert L,Jr PY - 2007/4/27/pubmed PY - 2007/6/21/medline PY - 2007/4/27/entrez SP - 901-10; discussion 901-10 JF - Neurosurgery JO - Neurosurgery VL - 60 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The goal was to develop an interactive three-dimensional (3-D) computerized anatomic model of the skull base for teaching microneurosurgical anatomy and for operative planning. METHODS: The 3-D model was constructed using commercially available software (Maya 6.0 Unlimited; Alias Systems Corp., Delaware, MD), a personal computer, four cranial specimens, and six dry bones. Photographs from at least two angles of the superior and lateral views were imported to the 3-D software. Many photographs were needed to produce the model in anatomically complex areas. Careful dissection was needed to expose important structures in the two views. Landmarks, including foramen, bone, and dura mater, were used as reference points. RESULTS: The 3-D model of the skull base and related structures was constructed using more than 300,000 remodeled polygons. The model can be viewed from any angle. It can be rotated 360 degrees in any plane using any structure as the focal point of rotation. The model can be reduced or enlarged using the zoom function. Variable transparencies could be assigned to any structures so that the structures at any level can be seen. Anatomic labels can be attached to the structures in the 3-D model for educational purposes. CONCLUSION: This computer-generated 3-D model can be observed and studied repeatedly without the time limitations and stresses imposed by surgery. This model may offer the potential to create interactive surgical exercises useful in evaluating multiple surgical routes to specific target areas in the skull base. SN - 1524-4040 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17460526/Construction_of_a_three_dimensional_interactive_model_of_the_skull_base_and_cranial_nerves_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -