Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Treatment-seeking behaviour for febrile illness in an area of seasonal malaria transmission in rural Ethiopia.
Malar J. 2007 Apr 26; 6:49.MJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Very little is known about the management of malaria and treatment-seeking patterns among children and adults in areas of seasonal malaria transmission particularly in east Africa.

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to assess treatment-seeking behaviour for reported malaria among all age groups in an area of seasonal transmission.

METHODS

A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out among 2,253 households in 12 randomly selected rural kebeles in Adami Tulu district in south-central Ethiopia, during October-November 2003, using a pre-tested interviewer-administered structured questionnaire.

RESULTS

Reported malaria was 14% among 12,225 people assessed during the last 14 days. Family/self-diagnosis was most common and the main first responses included visiting village-based community health workers (CHWs) (33%), public health facility (23%) and private clinic (17%). Home treatment was the least reported first response (3%). Only 13% had sought treatment within the first 24 hours of symptom onset. Early treatment-seeking pattern was reported among those who visited CHWs and practiced home treatment, with more delays among public facility users. Treatment-seeking behaviour was similar in all age groups.

CONCLUSION

A considerable proportion of visits were made to CHWs and private providers, necessitating the importance of strengthening both community-based interventions and peripheral public and private facilities. Finally, the community should be informed and educated about the importance of early diagnosis and prompt treatment with effective antimalarials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. deressaw@yahoo.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17462087

Citation

Deressa, Wakgari. "Treatment-seeking Behaviour for Febrile Illness in an Area of Seasonal Malaria Transmission in Rural Ethiopia." Malaria Journal, vol. 6, 2007, p. 49.
Deressa W. Treatment-seeking behaviour for febrile illness in an area of seasonal malaria transmission in rural Ethiopia. Malar J. 2007;6:49.
Deressa, W. (2007). Treatment-seeking behaviour for febrile illness in an area of seasonal malaria transmission in rural Ethiopia. Malaria Journal, 6, 49.
Deressa W. Treatment-seeking Behaviour for Febrile Illness in an Area of Seasonal Malaria Transmission in Rural Ethiopia. Malar J. 2007 Apr 26;6:49. PubMed PMID: 17462087.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment-seeking behaviour for febrile illness in an area of seasonal malaria transmission in rural Ethiopia. A1 - Deressa,Wakgari, Y1 - 2007/04/26/ PY - 2007/02/15/received PY - 2007/04/26/accepted PY - 2007/4/28/pubmed PY - 2007/5/26/medline PY - 2007/4/28/entrez SP - 49 EP - 49 JF - Malaria journal JO - Malar J VL - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Very little is known about the management of malaria and treatment-seeking patterns among children and adults in areas of seasonal malaria transmission particularly in east Africa. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess treatment-seeking behaviour for reported malaria among all age groups in an area of seasonal transmission. METHODS: A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out among 2,253 households in 12 randomly selected rural kebeles in Adami Tulu district in south-central Ethiopia, during October-November 2003, using a pre-tested interviewer-administered structured questionnaire. RESULTS: Reported malaria was 14% among 12,225 people assessed during the last 14 days. Family/self-diagnosis was most common and the main first responses included visiting village-based community health workers (CHWs) (33%), public health facility (23%) and private clinic (17%). Home treatment was the least reported first response (3%). Only 13% had sought treatment within the first 24 hours of symptom onset. Early treatment-seeking pattern was reported among those who visited CHWs and practiced home treatment, with more delays among public facility users. Treatment-seeking behaviour was similar in all age groups. CONCLUSION: A considerable proportion of visits were made to CHWs and private providers, necessitating the importance of strengthening both community-based interventions and peripheral public and private facilities. Finally, the community should be informed and educated about the importance of early diagnosis and prompt treatment with effective antimalarials. SN - 1475-2875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17462087/Treatment_seeking_behaviour_for_febrile_illness_in_an_area_of_seasonal_malaria_transmission_in_rural_Ethiopia_ L2 - https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2875-6-49 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -