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Regular tramadol use does not affect the propofol dose requirement for induction of anaesthesia.
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2007 Sep; 24(9):776-81.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

An increased risk of awareness during general anaesthesia in patients receiving tramadol has been reported. We studied whether tramadol affects the amount of propofol required for induction of anaesthesia.

METHODS

In this prospective controlled study, we evaluated 46 patients, half of whom used tramadol regularly. Entropy indices, state entropy and response entropy, were used to assess the level of hypnosis. Patients were anaesthetized with a propofol infusion (1 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) until they first became unconscious, and further until they developed a burst suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram. The doses of propofol needed to reach these end-points were recorded.

RESULTS

The amount (median, (range)) of propofol required for loss of consciousness was 2.0 (1.0-5.5) mg kg(-1) and 2.4 (0.9-8.3) mg kg(-1) (P=0.95) in the tramadol users and controls, respectively. The amount of propofol required for burst suppression was 5.8 (3.9-12.7) mg kg(-1) and 6.4 (2.9-15.1) mg kg(-1) (P=0.89) in the tramadol users and controls. There was no difference between the groups in state entropy and response entropy during different stages of induction of anaesthesia.

CONCLUSIONS

Tramadol did not affect the dose of propofol required to achieve loss of consciousness or burst suppression pattern in electroencephalogram during induction of general anaesthesia. However, there was a ninefold inter-individual variation in propofol dose requirement for loss of consciousness and a fivefold variation for reaching burst suppression. Due to extensive inter-individual variability, monitoring the level of hypnosis during general anaesthesia using propofol may enhance the correct dosage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Kuopio, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17462119

Citation

Kokki, H, et al. "Regular Tramadol Use Does Not Affect the Propofol Dose Requirement for Induction of Anaesthesia." European Journal of Anaesthesiology, vol. 24, no. 9, 2007, pp. 776-81.
Kokki H, Wennervirta J, Laisalmi M, et al. Regular tramadol use does not affect the propofol dose requirement for induction of anaesthesia. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2007;24(9):776-81.
Kokki, H., Wennervirta, J., Laisalmi, M., & Vakkuri, A. (2007). Regular tramadol use does not affect the propofol dose requirement for induction of anaesthesia. European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 24(9), 776-81.
Kokki H, et al. Regular Tramadol Use Does Not Affect the Propofol Dose Requirement for Induction of Anaesthesia. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2007;24(9):776-81. PubMed PMID: 17462119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Regular tramadol use does not affect the propofol dose requirement for induction of anaesthesia. AU - Kokki,H, AU - Wennervirta,J, AU - Laisalmi,M, AU - Vakkuri,A, Y1 - 2007/04/27/ PY - 2007/4/28/pubmed PY - 2007/12/19/medline PY - 2007/4/28/entrez SP - 776 EP - 81 JF - European journal of anaesthesiology JO - Eur J Anaesthesiol VL - 24 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: An increased risk of awareness during general anaesthesia in patients receiving tramadol has been reported. We studied whether tramadol affects the amount of propofol required for induction of anaesthesia. METHODS: In this prospective controlled study, we evaluated 46 patients, half of whom used tramadol regularly. Entropy indices, state entropy and response entropy, were used to assess the level of hypnosis. Patients were anaesthetized with a propofol infusion (1 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) until they first became unconscious, and further until they developed a burst suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram. The doses of propofol needed to reach these end-points were recorded. RESULTS: The amount (median, (range)) of propofol required for loss of consciousness was 2.0 (1.0-5.5) mg kg(-1) and 2.4 (0.9-8.3) mg kg(-1) (P=0.95) in the tramadol users and controls, respectively. The amount of propofol required for burst suppression was 5.8 (3.9-12.7) mg kg(-1) and 6.4 (2.9-15.1) mg kg(-1) (P=0.89) in the tramadol users and controls. There was no difference between the groups in state entropy and response entropy during different stages of induction of anaesthesia. CONCLUSIONS: Tramadol did not affect the dose of propofol required to achieve loss of consciousness or burst suppression pattern in electroencephalogram during induction of general anaesthesia. However, there was a ninefold inter-individual variation in propofol dose requirement for loss of consciousness and a fivefold variation for reaching burst suppression. Due to extensive inter-individual variability, monitoring the level of hypnosis during general anaesthesia using propofol may enhance the correct dosage. SN - 0265-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17462119/Regular_tramadol_use_does_not_affect_the_propofol_dose_requirement_for_induction_of_anaesthesia_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=17462119.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -