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Protein supplementation with sports protein bars in renal patients.
J Ren Nutr. 2007 May; 17(3):214-7.JR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Malnutrition prevalence in patients on dialysis is well established. The protein requirements for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis have been documented elsewhere, including the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Nutrition in Chronic Renal Failure. The clinical challenge is to assist patients in meeting these targets, especially in those with anorexia. Traditional supplements have included fluid, which is an issue for patients who are fluid restricted.

OBJECTIVES

The study objectives were to (1) investigate the range of sports protein supplements that may be suitable for patients on hemodialysis to use and (2) trial nonfluid protein supplements in patients on hemodialysis.

METHODS AND DESIGN

Known manufacturers of sports protein bars and other sports supplements available in Australia were contacted for the nutrient breakdown of high-protein products, specifically potassium, protein, and phosphorus contents. As a result, selected high-protein sports bars (Protein FX, Aussie Bodies, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) were used as an alternative to the more commonly used renal-specific fluid supplements (Nepro, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL; Novasource Renal, Novartis Nutrition Corporation, Fremont, MI; and Renilon, Nutricia, Wiltshire, UK) in patients with poor nutritional status requiring supplementation. Patient satisfaction and clinical nutrition markers were investigated.

SETTING

The study took place at inpatient, in-center, and satellite hemodialysis settings in Adelaide, South Australia.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 32 patients (16 females and 16 males) with an average age of 62.9 years (range 32-86 years) undergoing hemodialysis (acute and maintenance) were included. Subjects were selected by the author as part of routine clinical nutrition care.

INTERVENTION

Patients trialed sports protein bars as a protein supplement alone or in conjunction with other supplementary products.

RESULTS

All patients were in favor of the trial, with 22 of 32 patients continuing with the protein bars as the preferred supplement. The major reasons for not continuing were taste and chewability, especially in older patients with dentures. Serum potassium and phosphate levels were not increased with supplementation. Measured serum albumin and protein catabolic rate were considered unreliable indicators because not all patients were medically stable.

CONCLUSIONS

Sports protein bars are an acceptable protein and energy supplement for patients on hemodialysis. Sports protein bars are well accepted by patients except when dentures limit chewability. Sports protein bars have advantages over fluid-based supplements in patients with fluid restrictions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Renal Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, Australia. Anthony.Meade@nwahs.sa.gov.au <Anthony.Meade@nwahs.sa.gov.au>

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17462554

Citation

Meade, Anthony. "Protein Supplementation With Sports Protein Bars in Renal Patients." Journal of Renal Nutrition : the Official Journal of the Council On Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 17, no. 3, 2007, pp. 214-7.
Meade A. Protein supplementation with sports protein bars in renal patients. J Ren Nutr. 2007;17(3):214-7.
Meade, A. (2007). Protein supplementation with sports protein bars in renal patients. Journal of Renal Nutrition : the Official Journal of the Council On Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation, 17(3), 214-7.
Meade A. Protein Supplementation With Sports Protein Bars in Renal Patients. J Ren Nutr. 2007;17(3):214-7. PubMed PMID: 17462554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protein supplementation with sports protein bars in renal patients. A1 - Meade,Anthony, PY - 2006/02/06/received PY - 2007/4/28/pubmed PY - 2007/5/23/medline PY - 2007/4/28/entrez SP - 214 EP - 7 JF - Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation JO - J Ren Nutr VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Malnutrition prevalence in patients on dialysis is well established. The protein requirements for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis have been documented elsewhere, including the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Nutrition in Chronic Renal Failure. The clinical challenge is to assist patients in meeting these targets, especially in those with anorexia. Traditional supplements have included fluid, which is an issue for patients who are fluid restricted. OBJECTIVES: The study objectives were to (1) investigate the range of sports protein supplements that may be suitable for patients on hemodialysis to use and (2) trial nonfluid protein supplements in patients on hemodialysis. METHODS AND DESIGN: Known manufacturers of sports protein bars and other sports supplements available in Australia were contacted for the nutrient breakdown of high-protein products, specifically potassium, protein, and phosphorus contents. As a result, selected high-protein sports bars (Protein FX, Aussie Bodies, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) were used as an alternative to the more commonly used renal-specific fluid supplements (Nepro, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL; Novasource Renal, Novartis Nutrition Corporation, Fremont, MI; and Renilon, Nutricia, Wiltshire, UK) in patients with poor nutritional status requiring supplementation. Patient satisfaction and clinical nutrition markers were investigated. SETTING: The study took place at inpatient, in-center, and satellite hemodialysis settings in Adelaide, South Australia. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 32 patients (16 females and 16 males) with an average age of 62.9 years (range 32-86 years) undergoing hemodialysis (acute and maintenance) were included. Subjects were selected by the author as part of routine clinical nutrition care. INTERVENTION: Patients trialed sports protein bars as a protein supplement alone or in conjunction with other supplementary products. RESULTS: All patients were in favor of the trial, with 22 of 32 patients continuing with the protein bars as the preferred supplement. The major reasons for not continuing were taste and chewability, especially in older patients with dentures. Serum potassium and phosphate levels were not increased with supplementation. Measured serum albumin and protein catabolic rate were considered unreliable indicators because not all patients were medically stable. CONCLUSIONS: Sports protein bars are an acceptable protein and energy supplement for patients on hemodialysis. Sports protein bars are well accepted by patients except when dentures limit chewability. Sports protein bars have advantages over fluid-based supplements in patients with fluid restrictions. SN - 1532-8503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17462554/Protein_supplementation_with_sports_protein_bars_in_renal_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1051-2276(06)00304-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -