Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Predicting energy expenditure in extremely obese women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The most common clinical method for resting energy expenditure (REE) assessment is prediction equations. The purpose of this study was to elucidate which prediction equation is most accurate for REE assessment in extremely obese women.

METHODS

Fourteen extremely obese women (mean +/- SD body mass index: 49.8 +/- 6.2 kg/m(2); age: 49 +/- 10 years) were measured for height and weight and REE via indirect calorimetry (IC) by a metabolic cart system. Predicted REE was evaluated by several equations, including Harris-Benedict with actual body weight, Harris-Benedict with several adjustments to body weight, Cunningham, Mifflin-St Jeor, Owen, World Health Organization (WHO), and Bernstein equations. Accuracy was determined by mean difference data (IC REE - equation REE; Student's paired t-test), correlation coefficients, and agreement between methods by Bland-Altman plots. Accuracy was also evaluated on an individual basis, defined by the percentage of individuals within +/-10% of IC REE.

RESULTS

The Mifflin-St Jeor, Harris-Benedict with actual body weight, and the WHO equations were the most accurate in terms of mean predicted REE. The mean predicted REE values by all other equations were different from the IC REE values (p < .1). According to the individual data, the Mifflin-St Jeor was most accurate (14% outside +/-10% IC REE). The Harris-Benedict with actual body weight and WHO equations were less accurate on individual terms, with 29% and 42% of the predicted REE values, respectively, falling outside +/-10% of IC REE.

CONCLUSIONS

The Mifflin-St Jeor equation was most accurate method for REE assessment in extremely obese women.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108-6099, USA.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Basal Metabolism
    Body Mass Index
    Calorimetry, Indirect
    Energy Metabolism
    Female
    Humans
    Mathematics
    Middle Aged
    Nutrition Assessment
    Nutritional Requirements
    Obesity, Morbid
    Predictive Value of Tests
    Reproducibility of Results
    Sensitivity and Specificity

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17463148

    Citation

    Dobratz, Jennifer R., et al. "Predicting Energy Expenditure in Extremely Obese Women." JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 31, no. 3, 2007, pp. 217-27.
    Dobratz JR, Sibley SD, Beckman TR, et al. Predicting energy expenditure in extremely obese women. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007;31(3):217-27.
    Dobratz, J. R., Sibley, S. D., Beckman, T. R., Valentine, B. J., Kellogg, T. A., Ikramuddin, S., & Earthman, C. P. (2007). Predicting energy expenditure in extremely obese women. JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 31(3), pp. 217-27.
    Dobratz JR, et al. Predicting Energy Expenditure in Extremely Obese Women. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007;31(3):217-27. PubMed PMID: 17463148.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting energy expenditure in extremely obese women. AU - Dobratz,Jennifer R, AU - Sibley,Shalamar D, AU - Beckman,Tiffany R, AU - Valentine,Bret J, AU - Kellogg,Todd A, AU - Ikramuddin,Sayeed, AU - Earthman,Carrie P, PY - 2007/4/28/pubmed PY - 2007/6/26/medline PY - 2007/4/28/entrez SP - 217 EP - 27 JF - JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition JO - JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr VL - 31 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The most common clinical method for resting energy expenditure (REE) assessment is prediction equations. The purpose of this study was to elucidate which prediction equation is most accurate for REE assessment in extremely obese women. METHODS: Fourteen extremely obese women (mean +/- SD body mass index: 49.8 +/- 6.2 kg/m(2); age: 49 +/- 10 years) were measured for height and weight and REE via indirect calorimetry (IC) by a metabolic cart system. Predicted REE was evaluated by several equations, including Harris-Benedict with actual body weight, Harris-Benedict with several adjustments to body weight, Cunningham, Mifflin-St Jeor, Owen, World Health Organization (WHO), and Bernstein equations. Accuracy was determined by mean difference data (IC REE - equation REE; Student's paired t-test), correlation coefficients, and agreement between methods by Bland-Altman plots. Accuracy was also evaluated on an individual basis, defined by the percentage of individuals within +/-10% of IC REE. RESULTS: The Mifflin-St Jeor, Harris-Benedict with actual body weight, and the WHO equations were the most accurate in terms of mean predicted REE. The mean predicted REE values by all other equations were different from the IC REE values (p < .1). According to the individual data, the Mifflin-St Jeor was most accurate (14% outside +/-10% IC REE). The Harris-Benedict with actual body weight and WHO equations were less accurate on individual terms, with 29% and 42% of the predicted REE values, respectively, falling outside +/-10% of IC REE. CONCLUSIONS: The Mifflin-St Jeor equation was most accurate method for REE assessment in extremely obese women. SN - 0148-6071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17463148/Predicting_energy_expenditure_in_extremely_obese_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607107031003217 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -