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Lead exposure among females of childbearing age--United States, 2004.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Apr 27; 56(16):397-400.MM

Abstract

For centuries, exposure to high concentrations of lead has been known to pose health hazards, and evidence is mounting regarding adverse health effects from moderate- and low-level blood lead concentrations. Public health authorities use higher levels to define blood lead levels (BLLs) of concern in nonpregnant females (> or =25 microg/dL) compared with children (> or =10 microg/dL) and a lower level (> or =5 microg/dL) for pregnant females. This difference in levels for nonpregnant and pregnant females has raised concern because of the recognition that a proportion of nonpregnant females with BLLs > or =5 microg/dL will become pregnant and potentially expose their infants to a risk for adverse health effects from lead. Maternal and fetal BLLs are nearly identical because lead crosses the placenta unencumbered. This report summarizes 2004 surveillance data regarding elevated BLLs among females of childbearing age (i.e., aged 16-44 years) in 37 states participating in CDC's Adult Blood Lead Epidemiology and Surveillance (ABLES) program. The results indicated that rates of elevated BLLs ranged from 0.06 per 100,000 females of childbearing age at BLLs of > or =40 microg/dL to 10.9 per 100,000 females at BLLs of > or =5 microg/dL. Primary and secondary prevention of lead exposure among females of childbearing age is needed to avert neurobehavioral and cognitive deficits in their offspring.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17464282

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Lead Exposure Among Females of Childbearing age--United States, 2004." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 56, no. 16, 2007, pp. 397-400.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Lead exposure among females of childbearing age--United States, 2004. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007;56(16):397-400.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2007). Lead exposure among females of childbearing age--United States, 2004. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 56(16), 397-400.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Lead Exposure Among Females of Childbearing age--United States, 2004. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Apr 27;56(16):397-400. PubMed PMID: 17464282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lead exposure among females of childbearing age--United States, 2004. A1 - ,, PY - 2007/4/28/pubmed PY - 2007/5/1/medline PY - 2007/4/28/entrez SP - 397 EP - 400 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 56 IS - 16 N2 - For centuries, exposure to high concentrations of lead has been known to pose health hazards, and evidence is mounting regarding adverse health effects from moderate- and low-level blood lead concentrations. Public health authorities use higher levels to define blood lead levels (BLLs) of concern in nonpregnant females (> or =25 microg/dL) compared with children (> or =10 microg/dL) and a lower level (> or =5 microg/dL) for pregnant females. This difference in levels for nonpregnant and pregnant females has raised concern because of the recognition that a proportion of nonpregnant females with BLLs > or =5 microg/dL will become pregnant and potentially expose their infants to a risk for adverse health effects from lead. Maternal and fetal BLLs are nearly identical because lead crosses the placenta unencumbered. This report summarizes 2004 surveillance data regarding elevated BLLs among females of childbearing age (i.e., aged 16-44 years) in 37 states participating in CDC's Adult Blood Lead Epidemiology and Surveillance (ABLES) program. The results indicated that rates of elevated BLLs ranged from 0.06 per 100,000 females of childbearing age at BLLs of > or =40 microg/dL to 10.9 per 100,000 females at BLLs of > or =5 microg/dL. Primary and secondary prevention of lead exposure among females of childbearing age is needed to avert neurobehavioral and cognitive deficits in their offspring. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17464282/Lead_exposure_among_females_of_childbearing_age__United_States_2004_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5616a4.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -