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Semantic and phonetic enhancements for speech-in-noise recognition by native and non-native listeners.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Apr; 121(4):2339-49.JA

Abstract

Previous research has shown that speech recognition differences between native and proficient non-native listeners emerge under suboptimal conditions. Current evidence has suggested that the key deficit that underlies this disproportionate effect of unfavorable listening conditions for non-native listeners is their less effective use of compensatory information at higher levels of processing to recover from information loss at the phoneme identification level. The present study investigated whether this non-native disadvantage could be overcome if enhancements at various levels of processing were presented in combination. Native and non-native listeners were presented with English sentences in which the final word varied in predictability and which were produced in either plain or clear speech. Results showed that, relative to the low-predictability-plain-speech baseline condition, non-native listener final word recognition improved only when both semantic and acoustic enhancements were available (high-predictability-clear-speech). In contrast, the native listeners benefited from each source of enhancement separately and in combination. These results suggests that native and non-native listeners apply similar strategies for speech-in-noise perception: The crucial difference is in the signal clarity required for contextual information to be effective, rather than in an inability of non-native listeners to take advantage of this contextual information per se.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Linguistics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. abradlow@northwestern.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17471746

Citation

Bradlow, Ann R., and Jennifer A. Alexander. "Semantic and Phonetic Enhancements for Speech-in-noise Recognition By Native and Non-native Listeners." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 121, no. 4, 2007, pp. 2339-49.
Bradlow AR, Alexander JA. Semantic and phonetic enhancements for speech-in-noise recognition by native and non-native listeners. J Acoust Soc Am. 2007;121(4):2339-49.
Bradlow, A. R., & Alexander, J. A. (2007). Semantic and phonetic enhancements for speech-in-noise recognition by native and non-native listeners. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 121(4), 2339-49.
Bradlow AR, Alexander JA. Semantic and Phonetic Enhancements for Speech-in-noise Recognition By Native and Non-native Listeners. J Acoust Soc Am. 2007;121(4):2339-49. PubMed PMID: 17471746.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Semantic and phonetic enhancements for speech-in-noise recognition by native and non-native listeners. AU - Bradlow,Ann R, AU - Alexander,Jennifer A, PY - 2007/5/3/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/5/3/entrez SP - 2339 EP - 49 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J. Acoust. Soc. Am. VL - 121 IS - 4 N2 - Previous research has shown that speech recognition differences between native and proficient non-native listeners emerge under suboptimal conditions. Current evidence has suggested that the key deficit that underlies this disproportionate effect of unfavorable listening conditions for non-native listeners is their less effective use of compensatory information at higher levels of processing to recover from information loss at the phoneme identification level. The present study investigated whether this non-native disadvantage could be overcome if enhancements at various levels of processing were presented in combination. Native and non-native listeners were presented with English sentences in which the final word varied in predictability and which were produced in either plain or clear speech. Results showed that, relative to the low-predictability-plain-speech baseline condition, non-native listener final word recognition improved only when both semantic and acoustic enhancements were available (high-predictability-clear-speech). In contrast, the native listeners benefited from each source of enhancement separately and in combination. These results suggests that native and non-native listeners apply similar strategies for speech-in-noise perception: The crucial difference is in the signal clarity required for contextual information to be effective, rather than in an inability of non-native listeners to take advantage of this contextual information per se. SN - 0001-4966 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17471746/Semantic_and_phonetic_enhancements_for_speech_in_noise_recognition_by_native_and_non_native_listeners_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.2642103 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -