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Effect of postnatal catch-up growth on blood pressure in children at 3 years of age.
J Hum Hypertens 2007; 21(11):868-74JH

Abstract

Size at birth and early postnatal growth rates appear to be important determinants of cardiovascular diseases. We examined whether intrauterine growth restriction or the subsequent catch-up postnatal weight gain leads to higher blood pressure in early life to confirm that size at birth and early postnatal growth rates appear to be important determinants of blood pressure changes in early life. Of 407 children born between December 2001 and November 2002 in hospital based-birth cohorts, 102 were followed up at 3 years of age (24.2%) at Ewha Womans University Hospital in Seoul, Korea. At 3 years of age, those who had a low birth weight still belonged in the lower-weight group than the others. The subjects' systolic blood pressure was correlated with their current weight (r=0.41) and weight gain (r=0.39), but not with their birth weight. Those with a higher current weight and higher weight gain based on birth weight (conditional weight gain) had the highest blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure increased by 0.2 mm Hg for every 100-g increase in weight at 3 years and, independently, by 1.5 mm Hg for every 100-unit increase in conditional weight gain. This study suggests that birth weight is not directly associated with blood pressure, but accelerated growth, which occurs mostly in those born with a low birth weight, seems to affect blood pressure in early life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17476289

Citation

Min, J W., et al. "Effect of Postnatal Catch-up Growth On Blood Pressure in Children at 3 Years of Age." Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 21, no. 11, 2007, pp. 868-74.
Min JW, Kong KA, Park BH, et al. Effect of postnatal catch-up growth on blood pressure in children at 3 years of age. J Hum Hypertens. 2007;21(11):868-74.
Min, J. W., Kong, K. A., Park, B. H., Hong, J. H., Park, E. A., Cho, S. J., ... Park, H. (2007). Effect of postnatal catch-up growth on blood pressure in children at 3 years of age. Journal of Human Hypertension, 21(11), pp. 868-74.
Min JW, et al. Effect of Postnatal Catch-up Growth On Blood Pressure in Children at 3 Years of Age. J Hum Hypertens. 2007;21(11):868-74. PubMed PMID: 17476289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of postnatal catch-up growth on blood pressure in children at 3 years of age. AU - Min,J W, AU - Kong,K A, AU - Park,B H, AU - Hong,J H, AU - Park,E A, AU - Cho,S J, AU - Ha,E-H, AU - Park,H, Y1 - 2007/05/03/ PY - 2007/5/4/pubmed PY - 2008/1/11/medline PY - 2007/5/4/entrez SP - 868 EP - 74 JF - Journal of human hypertension JO - J Hum Hypertens VL - 21 IS - 11 N2 - Size at birth and early postnatal growth rates appear to be important determinants of cardiovascular diseases. We examined whether intrauterine growth restriction or the subsequent catch-up postnatal weight gain leads to higher blood pressure in early life to confirm that size at birth and early postnatal growth rates appear to be important determinants of blood pressure changes in early life. Of 407 children born between December 2001 and November 2002 in hospital based-birth cohorts, 102 were followed up at 3 years of age (24.2%) at Ewha Womans University Hospital in Seoul, Korea. At 3 years of age, those who had a low birth weight still belonged in the lower-weight group than the others. The subjects' systolic blood pressure was correlated with their current weight (r=0.41) and weight gain (r=0.39), but not with their birth weight. Those with a higher current weight and higher weight gain based on birth weight (conditional weight gain) had the highest blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure increased by 0.2 mm Hg for every 100-g increase in weight at 3 years and, independently, by 1.5 mm Hg for every 100-unit increase in conditional weight gain. This study suggests that birth weight is not directly associated with blood pressure, but accelerated growth, which occurs mostly in those born with a low birth weight, seems to affect blood pressure in early life. SN - 0950-9240 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17476289/Effect_of_postnatal_catch_up_growth_on_blood_pressure_in_children_at_3_years_of_age_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.jhh.1002215 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -