Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Respirable dust concentrations in equine stables. Part 1: validation of equipment and effect of various management systems.
Res Vet Sci. 2007 Oct; 83(2):256-62.RV

Abstract

Traditional methods of measuring airborne dust concentrations (ADC) in animal housing have included the collection of dust onto pre-weighed filters permitting the calculation of mean, not maximum, ADC. However real-time continuous particle monitors are advantageous in identifying short duration elevations in ADC which may be detrimental to equine respiratory health in the face of a relatively low mean ADC. These monitors have not previously been used to measure ADC in equine stables. Comparisons of a filter-based sampler and a real-time continuous particle monitor revealed no significant difference (P=0.079) and good agreement (>or=95% of the points fell within two standard deviations of the mean of the differences and the mean of the differences approximated zero) between the devices, with respect to mean respirable dust concentration (RDC) measurements. Investigations of the influence of various equine management systems on RDC revealed that both mean and maximum breathing zone RDC were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in equine stables by changing the environment from hay feed and straw bedding, to haylage feed and wood shavings bedding (reduction in mean - 0.0867mg/m(3) to 0.0260mg/m(3); reduction in maximum - 4.0758mg/m(3) to 0.2182mg/m(3), respectively).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Veterinary Centre, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, United Kingdom. jennyswain@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17477944

Citation

Clements, J M., and R S. Pirie. "Respirable Dust Concentrations in Equine Stables. Part 1: Validation of Equipment and Effect of Various Management Systems." Research in Veterinary Science, vol. 83, no. 2, 2007, pp. 256-62.
Clements JM, Pirie RS. Respirable dust concentrations in equine stables. Part 1: validation of equipment and effect of various management systems. Res Vet Sci. 2007;83(2):256-62.
Clements, J. M., & Pirie, R. S. (2007). Respirable dust concentrations in equine stables. Part 1: validation of equipment and effect of various management systems. Research in Veterinary Science, 83(2), 256-62.
Clements JM, Pirie RS. Respirable Dust Concentrations in Equine Stables. Part 1: Validation of Equipment and Effect of Various Management Systems. Res Vet Sci. 2007;83(2):256-62. PubMed PMID: 17477944.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respirable dust concentrations in equine stables. Part 1: validation of equipment and effect of various management systems. AU - Clements,J M, AU - Pirie,R S, Y1 - 2007/05/02/ PY - 2006/02/12/received PY - 2006/11/25/revised PY - 2006/12/07/accepted PY - 2007/5/5/pubmed PY - 2007/9/15/medline PY - 2007/5/5/entrez SP - 256 EP - 62 JF - Research in veterinary science JO - Res Vet Sci VL - 83 IS - 2 N2 - Traditional methods of measuring airborne dust concentrations (ADC) in animal housing have included the collection of dust onto pre-weighed filters permitting the calculation of mean, not maximum, ADC. However real-time continuous particle monitors are advantageous in identifying short duration elevations in ADC which may be detrimental to equine respiratory health in the face of a relatively low mean ADC. These monitors have not previously been used to measure ADC in equine stables. Comparisons of a filter-based sampler and a real-time continuous particle monitor revealed no significant difference (P=0.079) and good agreement (>or=95% of the points fell within two standard deviations of the mean of the differences and the mean of the differences approximated zero) between the devices, with respect to mean respirable dust concentration (RDC) measurements. Investigations of the influence of various equine management systems on RDC revealed that both mean and maximum breathing zone RDC were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in equine stables by changing the environment from hay feed and straw bedding, to haylage feed and wood shavings bedding (reduction in mean - 0.0867mg/m(3) to 0.0260mg/m(3); reduction in maximum - 4.0758mg/m(3) to 0.2182mg/m(3), respectively). SN - 0034-5288 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17477944/Respirable_dust_concentrations_in_equine_stables__Part_1:_validation_of_equipment_and_effect_of_various_management_systems_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0034-5288(06)00239-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -