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Cannabis induces different cognitive changes in schizophrenic patients and in healthy controls.

Abstract

It is known that 60 to 80% of schizophrenic patients show deficits in cognition. There may be an increase in these deficits as a result of additional regular use of cannabis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of chronic cannabis consumption on the cognitive functions of schizophrenic patients and healthy control subjects after a minimum abstinence time of 28 days. The study sample consisted of 39 schizophrenics (19 cannabis-abusers and 20 non-abusers) and 39 healthy controls (18 cannabis-abusers, 21 non-abusers). In a 2x2-factorial design (Diagnostic Groups [healthy controls, schizophrenic patients]xCannabis abuse [without, with]) with diagnostic group and cannabis consumption considered between-subject factors) we tested the hypothesis that dually diagnosed patients (i.e. suffering both from schizophrenia and cannabis abuse) perform worse in neuropsychological tests than schizophrenic patients without cannabis abuse. On the whole, schizophrenic patients performed worse than healthy control subjects. Surprisingly, rather than deteriorating neuropsychological performance, regular cannabis abuse prior to the first psychotic episode improved cognition in some tests. This was even more pronounced when regular consumption started before the age of 17. On the other hand, cannabis use deteriorated test performance in healthy controls, especially in cases when regular consumption started before the age of 17. To sum up, regular cannabis abuse has a different effect on cognitive function in schizophrenic patients and healthy controls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Eschenallee 3, Berlin, Germany. maria.jockers@charite.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17482741

Citation

Jockers-Scherübl, Maria C., et al. "Cannabis Induces Different Cognitive Changes in Schizophrenic Patients and in Healthy Controls." Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, vol. 31, no. 5, 2007, pp. 1054-63.
Jockers-Scherübl MC, Wolf T, Radzei N, et al. Cannabis induces different cognitive changes in schizophrenic patients and in healthy controls. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2007;31(5):1054-63.
Jockers-Scherübl, M. C., Wolf, T., Radzei, N., Schlattmann, P., Rentzsch, J., Gómez-Carrillo de Castro, A., & Kühl, K. P. (2007). Cannabis induces different cognitive changes in schizophrenic patients and in healthy controls. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 31(5), pp. 1054-63.
Jockers-Scherübl MC, et al. Cannabis Induces Different Cognitive Changes in Schizophrenic Patients and in Healthy Controls. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Jun 30;31(5):1054-63. PubMed PMID: 17482741.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis induces different cognitive changes in schizophrenic patients and in healthy controls. AU - Jockers-Scherübl,Maria C, AU - Wolf,Theresa, AU - Radzei,Nicole, AU - Schlattmann,Peter, AU - Rentzsch,Johannes, AU - Gómez-Carrillo de Castro,Ana, AU - Kühl,Klaus-Peter, Y1 - 2007/03/16/ PY - 2006/09/29/received PY - 2007/01/05/revised PY - 2007/03/06/accepted PY - 2007/5/8/pubmed PY - 2007/8/29/medline PY - 2007/5/8/entrez SP - 1054 EP - 63 JF - Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry JO - Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - It is known that 60 to 80% of schizophrenic patients show deficits in cognition. There may be an increase in these deficits as a result of additional regular use of cannabis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of chronic cannabis consumption on the cognitive functions of schizophrenic patients and healthy control subjects after a minimum abstinence time of 28 days. The study sample consisted of 39 schizophrenics (19 cannabis-abusers and 20 non-abusers) and 39 healthy controls (18 cannabis-abusers, 21 non-abusers). In a 2x2-factorial design (Diagnostic Groups [healthy controls, schizophrenic patients]xCannabis abuse [without, with]) with diagnostic group and cannabis consumption considered between-subject factors) we tested the hypothesis that dually diagnosed patients (i.e. suffering both from schizophrenia and cannabis abuse) perform worse in neuropsychological tests than schizophrenic patients without cannabis abuse. On the whole, schizophrenic patients performed worse than healthy control subjects. Surprisingly, rather than deteriorating neuropsychological performance, regular cannabis abuse prior to the first psychotic episode improved cognition in some tests. This was even more pronounced when regular consumption started before the age of 17. On the other hand, cannabis use deteriorated test performance in healthy controls, especially in cases when regular consumption started before the age of 17. To sum up, regular cannabis abuse has a different effect on cognitive function in schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. SN - 0278-5846 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17482741/Cannabis_induces_different_cognitive_changes_in_schizophrenic_patients_and_in_healthy_controls_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-5846(07)00099-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -