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Eastern minds in western cockpits: meta-analysis of human factors in mishaps from three nations.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Apr; 78(4):420-5.AS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Aviation accident rates vary in different regions; Asia and Africa have higher rates than Europe and America. There has been a great deal of discussion about the role of culture in aviation mishaps; however, culture is rarely mentioned as a contributory factor in accidents. It is hypothesized that different cultures will show different patterns in the underlying causal factors in aircraft accidents.

METHODS

Using a meta-analysis of previously published results, this research examined statistical differences in the 18 categories of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) across accidents in the Republic of China (Taiwan), India, and the United States.

RESULTS

Seven HFACS categories exhibited significant differences between these three regions. These were mostly concerned with contributory factors at the higher organizational levels. The differences were related to organizational processes, organizational climate, resource management, inadequate supervision, physical/mental limitations, adverse mental states, and decision errors.

CONCLUSION

Overall, the evidence from this research supports the observation that national cultures have an impact on aviation safety and adds further explanatory power with regards to why this should be so. The majority of the cultural issues identified seem to be associated with the style of management of the organizations rather than the operation of the aircraft per se.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychology Department, National Defence University, Taiwan, Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17484346

Citation

Li, Wen-Chin, et al. "Eastern Minds in Western Cockpits: Meta-analysis of Human Factors in Mishaps From Three Nations." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 78, no. 4, 2007, pp. 420-5.
Li WC, Harris D, Chen A. Eastern minds in western cockpits: meta-analysis of human factors in mishaps from three nations. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007;78(4):420-5.
Li, W. C., Harris, D., & Chen, A. (2007). Eastern minds in western cockpits: meta-analysis of human factors in mishaps from three nations. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 78(4), 420-5.
Li WC, Harris D, Chen A. Eastern Minds in Western Cockpits: Meta-analysis of Human Factors in Mishaps From Three Nations. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007;78(4):420-5. PubMed PMID: 17484346.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Eastern minds in western cockpits: meta-analysis of human factors in mishaps from three nations. AU - Li,Wen-Chin, AU - Harris,Don, AU - Chen,Aurora, PY - 2007/5/9/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/5/9/entrez SP - 420 EP - 5 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 78 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Aviation accident rates vary in different regions; Asia and Africa have higher rates than Europe and America. There has been a great deal of discussion about the role of culture in aviation mishaps; however, culture is rarely mentioned as a contributory factor in accidents. It is hypothesized that different cultures will show different patterns in the underlying causal factors in aircraft accidents. METHODS: Using a meta-analysis of previously published results, this research examined statistical differences in the 18 categories of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) across accidents in the Republic of China (Taiwan), India, and the United States. RESULTS: Seven HFACS categories exhibited significant differences between these three regions. These were mostly concerned with contributory factors at the higher organizational levels. The differences were related to organizational processes, organizational climate, resource management, inadequate supervision, physical/mental limitations, adverse mental states, and decision errors. CONCLUSION: Overall, the evidence from this research supports the observation that national cultures have an impact on aviation safety and adds further explanatory power with regards to why this should be so. The majority of the cultural issues identified seem to be associated with the style of management of the organizations rather than the operation of the aircraft per se. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17484346/Eastern_minds_in_western_cockpits:_meta_analysis_of_human_factors_in_mishaps_from_three_nations_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0095-6562&volume=78&issue=4&spage=420&aulast=Li DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -