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The effect of culture on symptom reporting: Hispanics and irritable bowel syndrome.
J Am Acad Nurse Pract 2007; 19(5):261-7JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To explore whether the symptoms reported by Mexican-American patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) meet the current diagnostic criteria.

DATA SOURCES

A retrospective review of charts of Mexican-American patients diagnosed with IBS at three large medical centers in central California was performed. Demographic information was extracted, and descriptive statistics were used to determine how symptoms were reported and whether the described symptoms met the Rome II criteria.

CONCLUSIONS

Only 63% of the Mexican-American patients in this study reported symptoms that met any of the nine Rome II criteria. There was no significant difference between patients who were English dominant and those who were monolingual Spanish in the concordance of their presenting complaint and the current diagnostic criteria. In addition, there was no significant gender difference in the rate at which symptoms met the Rome II criteria.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Assessment of illness and its symptoms requires that the practitioner have a clear understanding of what the illness means to the patient in order to develop an accurate diagnosis and an appropriate and timely plan of treatment. This study highlights the necessity of revising the symptom-based criteria for diagnosing IBS to include a wider array of reported complaints, taking into account the impact of culture on the perception and description of symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nursing, California State University, Fresno, Fresno, California 93740, USA. maryb@csufresno.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17489959

Citation

Barakzai, Mary D., et al. "The Effect of Culture On Symptom Reporting: Hispanics and Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, vol. 19, no. 5, 2007, pp. 261-7.
Barakzai MD, Gregory J, Fraser D. The effect of culture on symptom reporting: Hispanics and irritable bowel syndrome. J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2007;19(5):261-7.
Barakzai, M. D., Gregory, J., & Fraser, D. (2007). The effect of culture on symptom reporting: Hispanics and irritable bowel syndrome. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 19(5), pp. 261-7.
Barakzai MD, Gregory J, Fraser D. The Effect of Culture On Symptom Reporting: Hispanics and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2007;19(5):261-7. PubMed PMID: 17489959.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of culture on symptom reporting: Hispanics and irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Barakzai,Mary D, AU - Gregory,Jacqueline, AU - Fraser,Dorothy, PY - 2007/5/11/pubmed PY - 2007/7/12/medline PY - 2007/5/11/entrez SP - 261 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners JO - J Am Acad Nurse Pract VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To explore whether the symptoms reported by Mexican-American patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) meet the current diagnostic criteria. DATA SOURCES: A retrospective review of charts of Mexican-American patients diagnosed with IBS at three large medical centers in central California was performed. Demographic information was extracted, and descriptive statistics were used to determine how symptoms were reported and whether the described symptoms met the Rome II criteria. CONCLUSIONS: Only 63% of the Mexican-American patients in this study reported symptoms that met any of the nine Rome II criteria. There was no significant difference between patients who were English dominant and those who were monolingual Spanish in the concordance of their presenting complaint and the current diagnostic criteria. In addition, there was no significant gender difference in the rate at which symptoms met the Rome II criteria. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Assessment of illness and its symptoms requires that the practitioner have a clear understanding of what the illness means to the patient in order to develop an accurate diagnosis and an appropriate and timely plan of treatment. This study highlights the necessity of revising the symptom-based criteria for diagnosing IBS to include a wider array of reported complaints, taking into account the impact of culture on the perception and description of symptoms. SN - 1041-2972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17489959/The_effect_of_culture_on_symptom_reporting:_Hispanics_and_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-7599.2007.00223.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -