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Canine leptospirosis infections - clinical signs and outcome with different suspected Leptospira serogroups (42 cases).
J Small Anim Pract. 2007 Jun; 48(6):324-8.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of serum antibodies to different Leptospira serogroups in dogs with a clinical diagnosis of leptospirosis in southern Germany and to compare seroreactivity to different serogroups with history, clinical signs, laboratory findings and survival rate.

METHODS

In this study, the data of 42 dogs with the diagnosis of leptospirosis were evaluated retrospectively. Dogs were presented to the Small Animal Medicine Teaching Hospital (Medizinische Kleintierklinik) of the Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Germany, between 1990 to 2003.

RESULTS

Reactivity to the serogroup grippotyphosa (13/42) was most frequently present, followed by reactivity to the serogroup saxkoebing (10/42). There was no difference in the clinical picture and the laboratory changes between dogs whose sera were reactive to different serogroups.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

Most of the dogs with leptospirosis in southern Germany had sera reacting to serogroups other than icterohaemorrhagiae and canicola, which are contained in the vaccine. Thus, currently available vaccines in Europe do not protect against the most common Leptospira organisms associated with clinical disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medizinischen Kleintierklinik, Ludwig Maximillians University Munich, Veterinärstrasse 13, 80539 Munich, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17490440

Citation

Geisen, V, et al. "Canine Leptospirosis Infections - Clinical Signs and Outcome With Different Suspected Leptospira Serogroups (42 Cases)." The Journal of Small Animal Practice, vol. 48, no. 6, 2007, pp. 324-8.
Geisen V, Stengel C, Brem S, et al. Canine leptospirosis infections - clinical signs and outcome with different suspected Leptospira serogroups (42 cases). J Small Anim Pract. 2007;48(6):324-8.
Geisen, V., Stengel, C., Brem, S., Müller, W., Greene, C., & Hartmann, K. (2007). Canine leptospirosis infections - clinical signs and outcome with different suspected Leptospira serogroups (42 cases). The Journal of Small Animal Practice, 48(6), 324-8.
Geisen V, et al. Canine Leptospirosis Infections - Clinical Signs and Outcome With Different Suspected Leptospira Serogroups (42 Cases). J Small Anim Pract. 2007;48(6):324-8. PubMed PMID: 17490440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Canine leptospirosis infections - clinical signs and outcome with different suspected Leptospira serogroups (42 cases). AU - Geisen,V, AU - Stengel,C, AU - Brem,S, AU - Müller,W, AU - Greene,C, AU - Hartmann,K, Y1 - 2007/05/08/ PY - 2007/5/11/pubmed PY - 2007/7/31/medline PY - 2007/5/11/entrez SP - 324 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of small animal practice JO - J Small Anim Pract VL - 48 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of serum antibodies to different Leptospira serogroups in dogs with a clinical diagnosis of leptospirosis in southern Germany and to compare seroreactivity to different serogroups with history, clinical signs, laboratory findings and survival rate. METHODS: In this study, the data of 42 dogs with the diagnosis of leptospirosis were evaluated retrospectively. Dogs were presented to the Small Animal Medicine Teaching Hospital (Medizinische Kleintierklinik) of the Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Germany, between 1990 to 2003. RESULTS: Reactivity to the serogroup grippotyphosa (13/42) was most frequently present, followed by reactivity to the serogroup saxkoebing (10/42). There was no difference in the clinical picture and the laboratory changes between dogs whose sera were reactive to different serogroups. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Most of the dogs with leptospirosis in southern Germany had sera reacting to serogroups other than icterohaemorrhagiae and canicola, which are contained in the vaccine. Thus, currently available vaccines in Europe do not protect against the most common Leptospira organisms associated with clinical disease. SN - 0022-4510 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17490440/Canine_leptospirosis_infections___clinical_signs_and_outcome_with_different_suspected_Leptospira_serogroups__42_cases__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-5827.2007.00324.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -