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Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Neurology. 2007 May 15; 68(20):1694-700.Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examined the association between vascular headaches and retinal microvascular disease.

METHODS

We investigated the cross-sectional association between headaches (migraine/other headaches with aura, migraine without aura, other headaches without aura, no headaches) and retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking; arteriolar and venular calibers) among middle-aged African American and white men and women from the third examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1993 through 1995).

RESULTS

After controlling for age, gender, race, study center, and cardiovascular risk factors, we determined that persons with headaches were more likely to have retinopathy than those without a history of headaches (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.99 for migraine/other headaches with aura; OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.12 for migraine without aura; and OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.65 for other headaches). Associations with migraine were stronger among the subset of participants without a history of diabetes or hypertension (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.95 for migraine/other headaches with aura; and OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.71 for migraine without aura). Headaches were not associated with focal arteriolar narrowing or arteriovenous nicking. Persons with headaches tended to have smaller mean arteriolar and venular calibers; however, these associations did not tend to persist among those without hypertension or diabetes.

CONCLUSION

Middle-aged persons with migraine and other headaches were more likely to have retinopathy signs, supporting the hypothesis that neurovascular dysfunction may underlie vascular headaches.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA. kathyrn_rose@unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17502551

Citation

Rose, K M., et al. "Migraine and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study." Neurology, vol. 68, no. 20, 2007, pp. 1694-700.
Rose KM, Wong TY, Carson AP, et al. Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Neurology. 2007;68(20):1694-700.
Rose, K. M., Wong, T. Y., Carson, A. P., Couper, D. J., Klein, R., & Sharrett, A. R. (2007). Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Neurology, 68(20), 1694-700.
Rose KM, et al. Migraine and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Neurology. 2007 May 15;68(20):1694-700. PubMed PMID: 17502551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. AU - Rose,K M, AU - Wong,T Y, AU - Carson,A P, AU - Couper,D J, AU - Klein,R, AU - Sharrett,A R, PY - 2007/5/16/pubmed PY - 2007/6/8/medline PY - 2007/5/16/entrez SP - 1694 EP - 700 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 68 IS - 20 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between vascular headaches and retinal microvascular disease. METHODS: We investigated the cross-sectional association between headaches (migraine/other headaches with aura, migraine without aura, other headaches without aura, no headaches) and retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking; arteriolar and venular calibers) among middle-aged African American and white men and women from the third examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1993 through 1995). RESULTS: After controlling for age, gender, race, study center, and cardiovascular risk factors, we determined that persons with headaches were more likely to have retinopathy than those without a history of headaches (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.99 for migraine/other headaches with aura; OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.12 for migraine without aura; and OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.65 for other headaches). Associations with migraine were stronger among the subset of participants without a history of diabetes or hypertension (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.95 for migraine/other headaches with aura; and OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.71 for migraine without aura). Headaches were not associated with focal arteriolar narrowing or arteriovenous nicking. Persons with headaches tended to have smaller mean arteriolar and venular calibers; however, these associations did not tend to persist among those without hypertension or diabetes. CONCLUSION: Middle-aged persons with migraine and other headaches were more likely to have retinopathy signs, supporting the hypothesis that neurovascular dysfunction may underlie vascular headaches. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17502551/Migraine_and_retinal_microvascular_abnormalities:_the_Atherosclerosis_Risk_in_Communities_Study_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17502551 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -