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Depressed mood, cognitive impairment, and survival in older people admitted to care homes in England.
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007 Aug; 15(8):708-15.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate psychiatric morbidity, cognitive impairment, dependency, and survival in residents newly admitted to care homes.

METHODS

A total of 308 older people were assessed using measures of cognitive impairment and depressive symptomatology, and interviewable residents completed a quality-of-life interview. Dependency levels were assessed by interviews with staff and medication data were collected from home records. Follow-up assessments were carried out at five and nine months. A telephone follow-up approximately 12 months later augmented the survival data.

RESULTS

Of residents whose outcomes were known, 73% survived throughout the nine-month study period. Residents who died before the five-month follow-up had higher scores on the depression measure than those surviving longer. Reduced survival was predicted by greater dependency at baseline. Of 188 surviving residents, 63 (38%) were classified as depressed at baseline. Twenty-seven (43%) of the latter were still classed as depressed at five and nine months. Just 19% of residents rated as depressed at baseline were prescribed antidepressant medication, increasing to 26% at each follow-up. There was significant coexistence of cognitive impairment and depressive symptomatology.

CONCLUSION

High levels of mortality, psychiatric morbidity, and chronicity of depressed mood among residents requires care homes to improve access to specialist resources such as geriatric consultation, old-age psychiatry, occupational therapy, and physiotherapy. Findings suggest that future care standards should include external factors, such as the extent of access to relevant specialist services for vulnerable older people.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Personal Social Services Research Unit, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. caroline.sutcliffe@manchester.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17504909

Citation

Sutcliffe, Caroline, et al. "Depressed Mood, Cognitive Impairment, and Survival in Older People Admitted to Care Homes in England." The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 15, no. 8, 2007, pp. 708-15.
Sutcliffe C, Burns A, Challis D, et al. Depressed mood, cognitive impairment, and survival in older people admitted to care homes in England. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007;15(8):708-15.
Sutcliffe, C., Burns, A., Challis, D., Mozley, C. G., Cordingley, L., Bagley, H., & Huxley, P. (2007). Depressed mood, cognitive impairment, and survival in older people admitted to care homes in England. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, 15(8), 708-15.
Sutcliffe C, et al. Depressed Mood, Cognitive Impairment, and Survival in Older People Admitted to Care Homes in England. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007;15(8):708-15. PubMed PMID: 17504909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depressed mood, cognitive impairment, and survival in older people admitted to care homes in England. AU - Sutcliffe,Caroline, AU - Burns,Alistair, AU - Challis,David, AU - Mozley,Caroline Godlove, AU - Cordingley,Lis, AU - Bagley,Heather, AU - Huxley,Peter, Y1 - 2007/05/15/ PY - 2007/5/17/pubmed PY - 2007/10/16/medline PY - 2007/5/17/entrez SP - 708 EP - 15 JF - The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry JO - Am J Geriatr Psychiatry VL - 15 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate psychiatric morbidity, cognitive impairment, dependency, and survival in residents newly admitted to care homes. METHODS: A total of 308 older people were assessed using measures of cognitive impairment and depressive symptomatology, and interviewable residents completed a quality-of-life interview. Dependency levels were assessed by interviews with staff and medication data were collected from home records. Follow-up assessments were carried out at five and nine months. A telephone follow-up approximately 12 months later augmented the survival data. RESULTS: Of residents whose outcomes were known, 73% survived throughout the nine-month study period. Residents who died before the five-month follow-up had higher scores on the depression measure than those surviving longer. Reduced survival was predicted by greater dependency at baseline. Of 188 surviving residents, 63 (38%) were classified as depressed at baseline. Twenty-seven (43%) of the latter were still classed as depressed at five and nine months. Just 19% of residents rated as depressed at baseline were prescribed antidepressant medication, increasing to 26% at each follow-up. There was significant coexistence of cognitive impairment and depressive symptomatology. CONCLUSION: High levels of mortality, psychiatric morbidity, and chronicity of depressed mood among residents requires care homes to improve access to specialist resources such as geriatric consultation, old-age psychiatry, occupational therapy, and physiotherapy. Findings suggest that future care standards should include external factors, such as the extent of access to relevant specialist services for vulnerable older people. SN - 1064-7481 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17504909/Depressed_mood_cognitive_impairment_and_survival_in_older_people_admitted_to_care_homes_in_England_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/JGP.0b013e3180381537 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -