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Risk of second malignant neoplasms after childhood leukemia and lymphoma: an international study.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2007; 99(10):790-800JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Survivors of childhood leukemia and lymphoma experience high risks of second malignant neoplasms. We quantified such risk using a large dataset from 13 population-based cancer registries.

METHODS

The registries provided individual data on cases of leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurring in children aged 0-14 years and on subsequent second malignant neoplasms for different time periods from 1943 to 2000. Risks of second malignant neoplasms were assessed through standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), using the incidence rates in the general populations covered by the registries as a reference. Cumulative absolute risks were also calculated.

RESULTS

A total of 133 second malignant neoplasms were observed in 16,540 patients (12,731 leukemias, 1246 Hodgkin lymphomas, and 2563 non-Hodgkin lymphomas) after an average follow-up of 6.5 years. The most frequent second malignancies after leukemia were brain cancer (19 cases, SIR = 8.52, 95% CI = 5.13 to 13.3), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (nine cases, SIR = 9.41, 95% CI = 4.30 to 17.9), and thyroid cancer (nine cases, SIR = 18.8, 95% CI = 8.60 to 35.7); the most frequent after Hodgkin lymphoma were thyroid cancer (nine cases, SIR = 52.5, 95% CI = 24.0 to 99.6), breast cancer (six cases, SIR = 20.9, 95% CI = 7.66 to 45.4), and neoplasms of skin (non-melanoma) (six cases, SIR = 34.0, 95% CI = 12.5 to 74.0); and the most frequent after non-Hodgkin lymphoma were thyroid cancer (six cases, SIR = 40.4, 95% CI = 14.8 to 88.0) and brain cancer (four cases, SIR = 6.97, 95% CI = 1.90 to 17.9). Cumulative incidence of any second malignant neoplasm was 2.43% (95% CI = 1.09 to 3.78), 12.7% (95% CI = 8.29 to 17.2), and 2.50% (95% CI = 1.04 to 3.96) within 30 years from diagnosis of leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

This population-based study provides, to our knowledge, the most precise and up-to-date estimates for relative and absolute risks of second malignant neoplasms after childhood leukemia and lymphoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Childhood Cancer Registry of Piedmont, Cancer Epidemiology Unit, CPO Piemonte, CeRMS, University of Turin, Via Santena 7, 10126, Turin, Italy. milena.maule@unito.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17505074

Citation

Maule, Milena, et al. "Risk of Second Malignant Neoplasms After Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma: an International Study." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 99, no. 10, 2007, pp. 790-800.
Maule M, Scélo G, Pastore G, et al. Risk of second malignant neoplasms after childhood leukemia and lymphoma: an international study. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007;99(10):790-800.
Maule, M., Scélo, G., Pastore, G., Brennan, P., Hemminki, K., Tracey, E., ... Boffetta, P. (2007). Risk of second malignant neoplasms after childhood leukemia and lymphoma: an international study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 99(10), pp. 790-800.
Maule M, et al. Risk of Second Malignant Neoplasms After Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma: an International Study. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 May 16;99(10):790-800. PubMed PMID: 17505074.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of second malignant neoplasms after childhood leukemia and lymphoma: an international study. AU - Maule,Milena, AU - Scélo,Ghislaine, AU - Pastore,Guido, AU - Brennan,Paul, AU - Hemminki,Kari, AU - Tracey,Elizabeth, AU - Sankila,Risto, AU - Weiderpass,Elisabete, AU - Olsen,Jorgen H, AU - McBride,Mary L, AU - Brewster,David H, AU - Pompe-Kirn,Vera, AU - Kliewer,Erich V, AU - Chia,Kee Seng, AU - Tonita,Jon M, AU - Martos,Carmen, AU - Jonasson,Jon G, AU - Merletti,Franco, AU - Boffetta,Paolo, PY - 2007/5/17/pubmed PY - 2007/7/13/medline PY - 2007/5/17/entrez SP - 790 EP - 800 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 99 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Survivors of childhood leukemia and lymphoma experience high risks of second malignant neoplasms. We quantified such risk using a large dataset from 13 population-based cancer registries. METHODS: The registries provided individual data on cases of leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurring in children aged 0-14 years and on subsequent second malignant neoplasms for different time periods from 1943 to 2000. Risks of second malignant neoplasms were assessed through standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), using the incidence rates in the general populations covered by the registries as a reference. Cumulative absolute risks were also calculated. RESULTS: A total of 133 second malignant neoplasms were observed in 16,540 patients (12,731 leukemias, 1246 Hodgkin lymphomas, and 2563 non-Hodgkin lymphomas) after an average follow-up of 6.5 years. The most frequent second malignancies after leukemia were brain cancer (19 cases, SIR = 8.52, 95% CI = 5.13 to 13.3), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (nine cases, SIR = 9.41, 95% CI = 4.30 to 17.9), and thyroid cancer (nine cases, SIR = 18.8, 95% CI = 8.60 to 35.7); the most frequent after Hodgkin lymphoma were thyroid cancer (nine cases, SIR = 52.5, 95% CI = 24.0 to 99.6), breast cancer (six cases, SIR = 20.9, 95% CI = 7.66 to 45.4), and neoplasms of skin (non-melanoma) (six cases, SIR = 34.0, 95% CI = 12.5 to 74.0); and the most frequent after non-Hodgkin lymphoma were thyroid cancer (six cases, SIR = 40.4, 95% CI = 14.8 to 88.0) and brain cancer (four cases, SIR = 6.97, 95% CI = 1.90 to 17.9). Cumulative incidence of any second malignant neoplasm was 2.43% (95% CI = 1.09 to 3.78), 12.7% (95% CI = 8.29 to 17.2), and 2.50% (95% CI = 1.04 to 3.96) within 30 years from diagnosis of leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study provides, to our knowledge, the most precise and up-to-date estimates for relative and absolute risks of second malignant neoplasms after childhood leukemia and lymphoma. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17505074/Risk_of_second_malignant_neoplasms_after_childhood_leukemia_and_lymphoma:_an_international_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djk180 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -