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The association between C-reactive protein concentration and depression in later life is due to poor physical health: results from the Health in Men Study (HIMS).
Psychol Med 2007; 37(12):1775-86PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a non-specific marker of inflammation that has been associated with depression and vascular disease, particularly in men. This study aimed to investigate the association between high CRP concentration and depression while taking physical health into account.

METHOD

A cross-sectional study of a community-dwelling sample of 5438 men aged 70+. Participants with scores > or =7 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) were considered to display clinically significant depressive symptoms. We measured the serum concentration of CRP with a high-sensitivity assay. The assessment of physical co-morbidity included three components: the Charlson weighted index, self-report of major health events on a standardized questionnaire, and the physical component of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Other measured factors included age, native language, education, a standardized socio-economic index, smoking, prior or current history of depression treatment, cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score < 24 and body mass index (BMI).

RESULTS

Participants with depression(n=340) wereolder than their controls without depression (age in years: 76.6 +/- 4.4 v. 75.4+/- 4.1). Men with CRP concentration > 3 mg/l had an increased odds ratio (OR) [1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.11] of being depressed compared to men with CRP 3 mg/l. This association became non-significant once we adjusted the analysis for the measures of physical co-morbidity and other confounding factors (OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.86-1.73).

CONCLUSIONS

The physiological mechanisms that lead to the onset and maintenance of depressive symptoms in older men remain to be determined, but CRP concentration is unlikely to play a significant role in that process.

Authors+Show Affiliations

WA Centre for Health and Ageing, University of Western Australia, Australia. osvaldo.almeida@uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17506927

Citation

Almeida, Osvaldo P., et al. "The Association Between C-reactive Protein Concentration and Depression in Later Life Is Due to Poor Physical Health: Results From the Health in Men Study (HIMS)." Psychological Medicine, vol. 37, no. 12, 2007, pp. 1775-86.
Almeida OP, Norman P, Hankey GJ, et al. The association between C-reactive protein concentration and depression in later life is due to poor physical health: results from the Health in Men Study (HIMS). Psychol Med. 2007;37(12):1775-86.
Almeida, O. P., Norman, P., Hankey, G. J., Jamrozik, K., & Flicker, L. (2007). The association between C-reactive protein concentration and depression in later life is due to poor physical health: results from the Health in Men Study (HIMS). Psychological Medicine, 37(12), pp. 1775-86.
Almeida OP, et al. The Association Between C-reactive Protein Concentration and Depression in Later Life Is Due to Poor Physical Health: Results From the Health in Men Study (HIMS). Psychol Med. 2007;37(12):1775-86. PubMed PMID: 17506927.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association between C-reactive protein concentration and depression in later life is due to poor physical health: results from the Health in Men Study (HIMS). AU - Almeida,Osvaldo P, AU - Norman,Paul, AU - Hankey,Graeme J, AU - Jamrozik,Konrad, AU - Flicker,Leon, Y1 - 2007/05/17/ PY - 2007/5/18/pubmed PY - 2008/3/5/medline PY - 2007/5/18/entrez SP - 1775 EP - 86 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 37 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a non-specific marker of inflammation that has been associated with depression and vascular disease, particularly in men. This study aimed to investigate the association between high CRP concentration and depression while taking physical health into account. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of a community-dwelling sample of 5438 men aged 70+. Participants with scores > or =7 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) were considered to display clinically significant depressive symptoms. We measured the serum concentration of CRP with a high-sensitivity assay. The assessment of physical co-morbidity included three components: the Charlson weighted index, self-report of major health events on a standardized questionnaire, and the physical component of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Other measured factors included age, native language, education, a standardized socio-economic index, smoking, prior or current history of depression treatment, cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score < 24 and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Participants with depression(n=340) wereolder than their controls without depression (age in years: 76.6 +/- 4.4 v. 75.4+/- 4.1). Men with CRP concentration > 3 mg/l had an increased odds ratio (OR) [1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.11] of being depressed compared to men with CRP 3 mg/l. This association became non-significant once we adjusted the analysis for the measures of physical co-morbidity and other confounding factors (OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.86-1.73). CONCLUSIONS: The physiological mechanisms that lead to the onset and maintenance of depressive symptoms in older men remain to be determined, but CRP concentration is unlikely to play a significant role in that process. SN - 0033-2917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17506927/The_association_between_C_reactive_protein_concentration_and_depression_in_later_life_is_due_to_poor_physical_health:_results_from_the_Health_in_Men_Study__HIMS__ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0033291707000827/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -