Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes.

Abstract

Vitamin D inadequacy is pandemic among rehabilitation patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Male and female patients of all ages and ethnic backgrounds are affected. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis, causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia, and worsens proximal muscle strength and postural sway. Vitamin D inadequacy can be prevented by sensible sun exposure and adequate dietary intake with supplementation. Vitamin D status is determined by measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The recommended healthful serum level is between 30 and 60 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels of >30 ng/mL are sufficient to suppress parathyroid hormone production and to maximize the efficiency of dietary calcium absorption from the small intestine. This can be accomplished by ingesting 1000 IU of vitamin D(3) per day, or by taking 50,000 IU of vitamin D(2) every 2 weeks. Vitamin D toxicity is observed when 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels exceed 150 ng/mL. Identification and treatment of vitamin D deficiency reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures by improving bone health and musculoskeletal function. Vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myositis. There is a need for better education of health professionals and the general public regarding the optimization of vitamin D status in the care of rehabilitation patients.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Bone Density Conservation Agents
    Bone Diseases, Metabolic
    Diagnosis, Differential
    Humans
    Osteoporosis
    Pain Measurement
    Risk Factors
    Sunlight
    Treatment Outcome
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17507730

    Citation

    Shinchuk, Leonid M., et al. "Vitamin D and Rehabilitation: Improving Functional Outcomes." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 3, 2007, pp. 297-304.
    Shinchuk LM, Shinchuk L, Holick MF. Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes. Nutr Clin Pract. 2007;22(3):297-304.
    Shinchuk, L. M., Shinchuk, L., & Holick, M. F. (2007). Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 22(3), pp. 297-304.
    Shinchuk LM, Shinchuk L, Holick MF. Vitamin D and Rehabilitation: Improving Functional Outcomes. Nutr Clin Pract. 2007;22(3):297-304. PubMed PMID: 17507730.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes. AU - Shinchuk,Leonid M, AU - Shinchuk,Leonid, AU - Holick,Michael F, PY - 2007/5/18/pubmed PY - 2007/7/4/medline PY - 2007/5/18/entrez SP - 297 EP - 304 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - Vitamin D inadequacy is pandemic among rehabilitation patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Male and female patients of all ages and ethnic backgrounds are affected. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis, causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia, and worsens proximal muscle strength and postural sway. Vitamin D inadequacy can be prevented by sensible sun exposure and adequate dietary intake with supplementation. Vitamin D status is determined by measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The recommended healthful serum level is between 30 and 60 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels of >30 ng/mL are sufficient to suppress parathyroid hormone production and to maximize the efficiency of dietary calcium absorption from the small intestine. This can be accomplished by ingesting 1000 IU of vitamin D(3) per day, or by taking 50,000 IU of vitamin D(2) every 2 weeks. Vitamin D toxicity is observed when 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels exceed 150 ng/mL. Identification and treatment of vitamin D deficiency reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures by improving bone health and musculoskeletal function. Vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myositis. There is a need for better education of health professionals and the general public regarding the optimization of vitamin D status in the care of rehabilitation patients. SN - 0884-5336 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17507730/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0115426507022003297 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -