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Associations of glutathione S-transferase P1, M1, and environmental tobacco smoke with wheezing illness in school children.
Allergy. 2007 Jun; 62(6):641-7.A

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Polymorphisms at the glutathione S-transferase (GST) were associated with asthma-related phenotypes. We hypothesized that the GSTP1 and GSTM1 genotypes could modify the effects of household environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on childhood wheezing illness.

METHODS

We conducted a case-control study comprised of 216 lifetime wheezing children and 185 nonwheezing controls, all of whom were selected from 2524 fourth- to ninth-grade school children in southern Taiwan.

RESULTS

Homozygous GSTP1 Ile-105 was significantly associated with current wheezing (OR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.04-3.12), but insignificantly associated with ever wheezing (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 0.82-1.94). The risks of ever or current wheezing on GSTM1 null genotype were positive but not statistically significant. Although household ETS exposure was not associated with wheezing illness, after excluding subjects having in utero ETS or active smoking habits, the adverse effects of household ETS exposure differed significantly by GSTP1-105 genotypes. In children without any ETS exposure at home, GSTP1 Ile-105 homozygosity was significantly related to increased risks for both ever wheezing (OR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.17-4.49) and current wheezing (OR = 4.86, 95% CI 1.86-12.70). In children with household ETS exposure, the risks of wheezing illness did not increase for those carrying two GSTP1 Ile-105 alleles. Children carrying any GSTP1 Val-105 allele were at a significantly greater risk of both ever and current wheezing when exposed to ETS, with a clear dose-response relationship to the number of smokers at home.

CONCLUSION

Household ETS exposure is a modifiable cause of wheezing illness in a genetically susceptible subpopulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17508968

Citation

Lee, Y-L, et al. "Associations of Glutathione S-transferase P1, M1, and Environmental Tobacco Smoke With Wheezing Illness in School Children." Allergy, vol. 62, no. 6, 2007, pp. 641-7.
Lee YL, Lee YC, Guo YL. Associations of glutathione S-transferase P1, M1, and environmental tobacco smoke with wheezing illness in school children. Allergy. 2007;62(6):641-7.
Lee, Y. L., Lee, Y. C., & Guo, Y. L. (2007). Associations of glutathione S-transferase P1, M1, and environmental tobacco smoke with wheezing illness in school children. Allergy, 62(6), 641-7.
Lee YL, Lee YC, Guo YL. Associations of Glutathione S-transferase P1, M1, and Environmental Tobacco Smoke With Wheezing Illness in School Children. Allergy. 2007;62(6):641-7. PubMed PMID: 17508968.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of glutathione S-transferase P1, M1, and environmental tobacco smoke with wheezing illness in school children. AU - Lee,Y-L, AU - Lee,Y-C, AU - Guo,Y L, PY - 2007/5/19/pubmed PY - 2007/9/13/medline PY - 2007/5/19/entrez SP - 641 EP - 7 JF - Allergy JO - Allergy VL - 62 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms at the glutathione S-transferase (GST) were associated with asthma-related phenotypes. We hypothesized that the GSTP1 and GSTM1 genotypes could modify the effects of household environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on childhood wheezing illness. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study comprised of 216 lifetime wheezing children and 185 nonwheezing controls, all of whom were selected from 2524 fourth- to ninth-grade school children in southern Taiwan. RESULTS: Homozygous GSTP1 Ile-105 was significantly associated with current wheezing (OR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.04-3.12), but insignificantly associated with ever wheezing (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 0.82-1.94). The risks of ever or current wheezing on GSTM1 null genotype were positive but not statistically significant. Although household ETS exposure was not associated with wheezing illness, after excluding subjects having in utero ETS or active smoking habits, the adverse effects of household ETS exposure differed significantly by GSTP1-105 genotypes. In children without any ETS exposure at home, GSTP1 Ile-105 homozygosity was significantly related to increased risks for both ever wheezing (OR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.17-4.49) and current wheezing (OR = 4.86, 95% CI 1.86-12.70). In children with household ETS exposure, the risks of wheezing illness did not increase for those carrying two GSTP1 Ile-105 alleles. Children carrying any GSTP1 Val-105 allele were at a significantly greater risk of both ever and current wheezing when exposed to ETS, with a clear dose-response relationship to the number of smokers at home. CONCLUSION: Household ETS exposure is a modifiable cause of wheezing illness in a genetically susceptible subpopulation. SN - 0105-4538 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17508968/Associations_of_glutathione_S_transferase_P1_M1_and_environmental_tobacco_smoke_with_wheezing_illness_in_school_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2007.01380.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -