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Non-smokers' responses when smokers light up: a population-based study.
Prev Med. 2007 Jul; 45(1):21-5.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examines the extent to which the 'common courtesy approach' is adopted by non-smokers when in the presence of smokers, in the state of Victoria, Australia, where restrictions on smoking in public places are relatively comprehensive.

METHOD

4,765 non-smokers aged 18 years and over were surveyed over two representative population telephone-administered surveys of randomly sampled Victorians conducted in 2004 and 2005.

RESULTS

Only 5.5% of non-smokers said they would ask a person to stop smoking if they lit up a cigarette nearby. The majority of non-smokers (74.7%) reported they would move away and 16.4% said they would do nothing. When asked what they would do if, in a public place, someone next to them asked if they minded whether they smoked, 48.8% of non-smokers reported they would say they would prefer it if they didn't smoke, while 28.0% reported that they would tell the person they don't mind when they would prefer that person not smoke. Overall, 46.7% of non-smokers indicated they would consent to be exposed to second-hand smoke if someone asked them this question.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings underline the importance of smoke-free policies in protecting a significant proportion of the non-smoker population, who remain unlikely to protect themselves individually.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer, Cancer Control Research Institute, The Cancer Council Victoria, 1 Rathdowne Street, Carlton Victoria 3053, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17509677

Citation

Germain, Daniella, et al. "Non-smokers' Responses when Smokers Light Up: a Population-based Study." Preventive Medicine, vol. 45, no. 1, 2007, pp. 21-5.
Germain D, Wakefield M, Durkin S. Non-smokers' responses when smokers light up: a population-based study. Prev Med. 2007;45(1):21-5.
Germain, D., Wakefield, M., & Durkin, S. (2007). Non-smokers' responses when smokers light up: a population-based study. Preventive Medicine, 45(1), 21-5.
Germain D, Wakefield M, Durkin S. Non-smokers' Responses when Smokers Light Up: a Population-based Study. Prev Med. 2007;45(1):21-5. PubMed PMID: 17509677.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-smokers' responses when smokers light up: a population-based study. AU - Germain,Daniella, AU - Wakefield,Melanie, AU - Durkin,Sarah, Y1 - 2007/04/14/ PY - 2006/09/13/received PY - 2007/03/26/revised PY - 2007/03/28/accepted PY - 2007/5/19/pubmed PY - 2007/10/24/medline PY - 2007/5/19/entrez SP - 21 EP - 5 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 45 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examines the extent to which the 'common courtesy approach' is adopted by non-smokers when in the presence of smokers, in the state of Victoria, Australia, where restrictions on smoking in public places are relatively comprehensive. METHOD: 4,765 non-smokers aged 18 years and over were surveyed over two representative population telephone-administered surveys of randomly sampled Victorians conducted in 2004 and 2005. RESULTS: Only 5.5% of non-smokers said they would ask a person to stop smoking if they lit up a cigarette nearby. The majority of non-smokers (74.7%) reported they would move away and 16.4% said they would do nothing. When asked what they would do if, in a public place, someone next to them asked if they minded whether they smoked, 48.8% of non-smokers reported they would say they would prefer it if they didn't smoke, while 28.0% reported that they would tell the person they don't mind when they would prefer that person not smoke. Overall, 46.7% of non-smokers indicated they would consent to be exposed to second-hand smoke if someone asked them this question. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings underline the importance of smoke-free policies in protecting a significant proportion of the non-smoker population, who remain unlikely to protect themselves individually. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17509677/Non_smokers'_responses_when_smokers_light_up:_a_population_based_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(07)00141-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -