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A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
Gen Dent. 2007 May-Jun; 55(3):236-7.GD

Abstract

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Care Planning and Restorative Sciences, University of Mississippi School of Dentistry, Jackson, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17511369

Citation

Rubel, Barry S.. "A Case of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever." General Dentistry, vol. 55, no. 3, 2007, pp. 236-7.
Rubel BS. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Gen Dent. 2007;55(3):236-7.
Rubel, B. S. (2007). A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. General Dentistry, 55(3), 236-7.
Rubel BS. A Case of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Gen Dent. 2007 May-Jun;55(3):236-7. PubMed PMID: 17511369.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. A1 - Rubel,Barry S, PY - 2007/5/22/pubmed PY - 2007/6/20/medline PY - 2007/5/22/entrez SP - 236 EP - 7 JF - General dentistry JO - Gen Dent VL - 55 IS - 3 N2 - Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made. SN - 0363-6771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17511369/A_case_of_Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6349 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -