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The adiponectin-to-leptin ratio in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: relation to insulin resistance and proinflammatory markers.
Metabolism. 2007 Jun; 56(6):766-71.M

Abstract

Central adiposity plays an important role in the insulin resistance of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) through the dysregulated production of various adipokines. Polycystic ovary syndrome has also been described as a low-grade inflammation state characterized by elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Furthermore, CRP is a strong independent predictor of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Recently, the adiponectin-to-leptin (A/L) ratio has been proposed as a potential atherogenic index in obese type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of the A/L ratio in the metabolic and proinflammatory phenotype of PCOS. We studied 74 Greek women with PCOS (38 normal-weight and 36 overweight-obese women). The A/L ratio was negatively correlated with BMI (r = -0.79 P < .001), homeostasis model assessment (r = -0.642, P < .001), triglycerides (r = -0.67, P < .001), and total cholesterol (r = -0.38, P < .01), and positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.38, P < .01) and sex hormone-binding globulin (r = 0.39, P = .001). After controlling for BMI, the A/L ratio was independently associated with insulin resistance indexes and triglycerides. Furthermore, the A/L ratio was negatively correlated with CRP (r = -0.746, P < .0001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that BMI and the A/L ratio were the only independent significant determinants of CRP (beta = .436, P = .003 and beta = -.398, P = .007, respectively). Studying normal-weight and overweight-obese women separately, we found an independent association between the A/L ratio and CRP in both groups (beta = -.460, P = .009 in normal-weight women and beta = -.570, P = .001 in overweight-obese women). In conclusion, the A/L ratio may serve as a biomarker of both insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, providing the link between these cardiovascular risk factors in women with PCOS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17512308

Citation

Xita, Nectaria, et al. "The Adiponectin-to-leptin Ratio in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Insulin Resistance and Proinflammatory Markers." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 56, no. 6, 2007, pp. 766-71.
Xita N, Papassotiriou I, Georgiou I, et al. The adiponectin-to-leptin ratio in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: relation to insulin resistance and proinflammatory markers. Metabolism. 2007;56(6):766-71.
Xita, N., Papassotiriou, I., Georgiou, I., Vounatsou, M., Margeli, A., & Tsatsoulis, A. (2007). The adiponectin-to-leptin ratio in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: relation to insulin resistance and proinflammatory markers. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 56(6), 766-71.
Xita N, et al. The Adiponectin-to-leptin Ratio in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Insulin Resistance and Proinflammatory Markers. Metabolism. 2007;56(6):766-71. PubMed PMID: 17512308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The adiponectin-to-leptin ratio in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: relation to insulin resistance and proinflammatory markers. AU - Xita,Nectaria, AU - Papassotiriou,Ioannis, AU - Georgiou,Ioannis, AU - Vounatsou,Maria, AU - Margeli,Alexandra, AU - Tsatsoulis,Agathocles, PY - 2006/09/12/received PY - 2007/01/24/accepted PY - 2007/5/22/pubmed PY - 2007/7/21/medline PY - 2007/5/22/entrez SP - 766 EP - 71 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 56 IS - 6 N2 - Central adiposity plays an important role in the insulin resistance of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) through the dysregulated production of various adipokines. Polycystic ovary syndrome has also been described as a low-grade inflammation state characterized by elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Furthermore, CRP is a strong independent predictor of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Recently, the adiponectin-to-leptin (A/L) ratio has been proposed as a potential atherogenic index in obese type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of the A/L ratio in the metabolic and proinflammatory phenotype of PCOS. We studied 74 Greek women with PCOS (38 normal-weight and 36 overweight-obese women). The A/L ratio was negatively correlated with BMI (r = -0.79 P < .001), homeostasis model assessment (r = -0.642, P < .001), triglycerides (r = -0.67, P < .001), and total cholesterol (r = -0.38, P < .01), and positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.38, P < .01) and sex hormone-binding globulin (r = 0.39, P = .001). After controlling for BMI, the A/L ratio was independently associated with insulin resistance indexes and triglycerides. Furthermore, the A/L ratio was negatively correlated with CRP (r = -0.746, P < .0001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that BMI and the A/L ratio were the only independent significant determinants of CRP (beta = .436, P = .003 and beta = -.398, P = .007, respectively). Studying normal-weight and overweight-obese women separately, we found an independent association between the A/L ratio and CRP in both groups (beta = -.460, P = .009 in normal-weight women and beta = -.570, P = .001 in overweight-obese women). In conclusion, the A/L ratio may serve as a biomarker of both insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, providing the link between these cardiovascular risk factors in women with PCOS. SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17512308/The_adiponectin_to_leptin_ratio_in_women_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome:_relation_to_insulin_resistance_and_proinflammatory_markers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(07)00060-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -