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Movement abnormalities and the progression of prodromal symptomatology in adolescents at risk for psychotic disorders.
J Abnorm Psychol. 2007 May; 116(2):260-7.JA

Abstract

The link between movement abnormalities and psychotic disorders is presumed to reflect common neural mechanisms that influence both motor functions and vulnerability to psychosis. The prodromal period leading to psychotic disorders represents both a viable point for intervention and a developmental period that, if studied, could shed light on etiology; however, no published studies have examined the temporal progression of this link. A group with high levels of prodromal symptomatology (i.e., adolescents with schizotypal personality disorder [SPD]; n = 42) and both psychiatric controls (with other personality disorders or conduct disorder [OD]; n = 30) and nonpsychiatric controls ([NC]; n = 49) were recruited. Videotapes of structured psychiatric interviews were coded for movement abnormalities by raters blind to participants' diagnostic status, and follow-up assessments were conducted 1 year later. Controlling for psychotropic medications, the authors found that adolescents with SPD exhibited significantly more motor abnormalities in the face and upper body than did OD and NC controls. At baseline, movement abnormalities were positively correlated with the severity of positive, negative, and total prodromal symptoms. Within the SPD group, baseline movement abnormalities predicted symptom severity 1 year later. Movement abnormalities represent an early risk indicator that may be predictive of later symptom severity and potentially of psychosis onset.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. vmittal@emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17516759

Citation

Mittal, Vijay A., et al. "Movement Abnormalities and the Progression of Prodromal Symptomatology in Adolescents at Risk for Psychotic Disorders." Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 116, no. 2, 2007, pp. 260-7.
Mittal VA, Tessner KD, Trottman HD, et al. Movement abnormalities and the progression of prodromal symptomatology in adolescents at risk for psychotic disorders. J Abnorm Psychol. 2007;116(2):260-7.
Mittal, V. A., Tessner, K. D., Trottman, H. D., Esterberg, M., Dhrub, S. H., Simeonova, D. I., McMillan, A. L., Murphy, E., Saczawa, M. E., & Walker, E. F. (2007). Movement abnormalities and the progression of prodromal symptomatology in adolescents at risk for psychotic disorders. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 116(2), 260-7.
Mittal VA, et al. Movement Abnormalities and the Progression of Prodromal Symptomatology in Adolescents at Risk for Psychotic Disorders. J Abnorm Psychol. 2007;116(2):260-7. PubMed PMID: 17516759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Movement abnormalities and the progression of prodromal symptomatology in adolescents at risk for psychotic disorders. AU - Mittal,Vijay A, AU - Tessner,Kevin D, AU - Trottman,Hanan D, AU - Esterberg,Michelle, AU - Dhrub,Shivali H, AU - Simeonova,Diana I, AU - McMillan,Amanda L, AU - Murphy,Erin, AU - Saczawa,Mary E, AU - Walker,Elaine F, PY - 2007/5/23/pubmed PY - 2007/7/17/medline PY - 2007/5/23/entrez SP - 260 EP - 7 JF - Journal of abnormal psychology JO - J Abnorm Psychol VL - 116 IS - 2 N2 - The link between movement abnormalities and psychotic disorders is presumed to reflect common neural mechanisms that influence both motor functions and vulnerability to psychosis. The prodromal period leading to psychotic disorders represents both a viable point for intervention and a developmental period that, if studied, could shed light on etiology; however, no published studies have examined the temporal progression of this link. A group with high levels of prodromal symptomatology (i.e., adolescents with schizotypal personality disorder [SPD]; n = 42) and both psychiatric controls (with other personality disorders or conduct disorder [OD]; n = 30) and nonpsychiatric controls ([NC]; n = 49) were recruited. Videotapes of structured psychiatric interviews were coded for movement abnormalities by raters blind to participants' diagnostic status, and follow-up assessments were conducted 1 year later. Controlling for psychotropic medications, the authors found that adolescents with SPD exhibited significantly more motor abnormalities in the face and upper body than did OD and NC controls. At baseline, movement abnormalities were positively correlated with the severity of positive, negative, and total prodromal symptoms. Within the SPD group, baseline movement abnormalities predicted symptom severity 1 year later. Movement abnormalities represent an early risk indicator that may be predictive of later symptom severity and potentially of psychosis onset. SN - 0021-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17516759/Movement_abnormalities_and_the_progression_of_prodromal_symptomatology_in_adolescents_at_risk_for_psychotic_disorders_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/abn/116/2/260 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -