Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Clinical evaluation of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

Abstract

The florid positive symptoms of schizophrenia (hallucinations, delusions, grossly disordered thinking) are often obvious. By comparison, negative symptoms (flattened affect, impoverished speech, apathy, avolition, anhedonia) are subtler and more difficult to recognize and diagnose. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Secondary negative symptoms attributable to such factors as unrelieved positive symptoms, the adverse effects of antipsychotic pharmacotherapy, or social isolation may subside with resolution of such factors. In contrast, primary negative symptoms are an intrinsic aspect of schizophrenia; they are persistent and have been associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Although the lack of a reliably effective treatment for negative symptoms is a serious unmet need in this patient population, accurate diagnosis is still important. Assessment of suspected negative symptoms, using validated rating scales, can help to rule out comorbid affective or cognitive disorders that may mimic negative symptoms and to distinguish primary negative symptoms from potentially reversible secondary negative symptoms. This article reviews the definitions and classification of negative symptoms, compares the tools available for their assessment, and offers practical clinical algorithms for sorting through the differential diagnosis.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Nussbaumstrasse 7, 80336 Munich, Germany. hans-juergen.moeller@med.uni-muenchen.de

    Source

    MeSH

    Algorithms
    Cognition Disorders
    Delusions
    Depressive Disorder
    Diagnosis, Differential
    Hallucinations
    Humans
    Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
    Psychotropic Drugs
    Quality of Life
    Schizophrenia
    Schizophrenic Psychology

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17524626

    Citation

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen. "Clinical Evaluation of Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia." European Psychiatry : the Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists, vol. 22, no. 6, 2007, pp. 380-6.
    Möller HJ. Clinical evaluation of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Eur Psychiatry. 2007;22(6):380-6.
    Möller, H. J. (2007). Clinical evaluation of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. European Psychiatry : the Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists, 22(6), pp. 380-6.
    Möller HJ. Clinical Evaluation of Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia. Eur Psychiatry. 2007;22(6):380-6. PubMed PMID: 17524626.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical evaluation of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. A1 - Möller,Hans-Jürgen, Y1 - 2007/05/23/ PY - 2006/10/16/received PY - 2007/03/20/revised PY - 2007/03/28/accepted PY - 2007/5/26/pubmed PY - 2008/1/11/medline PY - 2007/5/26/entrez SP - 380 EP - 6 JF - European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists JO - Eur. Psychiatry VL - 22 IS - 6 N2 - The florid positive symptoms of schizophrenia (hallucinations, delusions, grossly disordered thinking) are often obvious. By comparison, negative symptoms (flattened affect, impoverished speech, apathy, avolition, anhedonia) are subtler and more difficult to recognize and diagnose. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Secondary negative symptoms attributable to such factors as unrelieved positive symptoms, the adverse effects of antipsychotic pharmacotherapy, or social isolation may subside with resolution of such factors. In contrast, primary negative symptoms are an intrinsic aspect of schizophrenia; they are persistent and have been associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Although the lack of a reliably effective treatment for negative symptoms is a serious unmet need in this patient population, accurate diagnosis is still important. Assessment of suspected negative symptoms, using validated rating scales, can help to rule out comorbid affective or cognitive disorders that may mimic negative symptoms and to distinguish primary negative symptoms from potentially reversible secondary negative symptoms. This article reviews the definitions and classification of negative symptoms, compares the tools available for their assessment, and offers practical clinical algorithms for sorting through the differential diagnosis. SN - 0924-9338 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17524626/Clinical_evaluation_of_negative_symptoms_in_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924-9338(07)01311-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -