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Lack of association between serum uric acid and organ damage in a never-treated essential hypertensive population at low prevalence of hyperuricemia.
Am J Hypertens. 2007 Jun; 20(6):678-85.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is still undefined whether serum uric acid (SUA) is an independent risk factor for target organ damage (TOD) and cardiovascular events in human hypertension. We sought to investigate the association of SUA with subclinical cardiac, vascular, and renal alterations in never-treated uncomplicated essential hypertensives.

METHODS

A total of 580 subjects with recently diagnosed (<1 year) grade 1 and 2 hypertension, categorized by sex and tertiles of SUA levels, were considered for this analysis. All subjects underwent extensive clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonographic investigations searching for cardiac and extracardiac TOD.

RESULTS

Hyperuricemia (SUA >7.0 mg/dL in men and >6 mg/dL in women) was present in 8.3% of the patients. The overall prevalence of left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), carotid alterations, and microalbuminuria was 28%, 27%, and 8%, respectively. No differences in the prevalence rates of these TOD markers were present across all SUA tertiles in the entire population, as well as in both sexes. The SUA levels were similar in patients with and without LVH, carotid alterations, or microalbuminuria. When patients were classified according to the number of organs involved, those with multiple TOD (2 or 3 organs) had significantly higher SUA levels (5.1 +/- 1.3 or 5.2 +/- 1.4 mg/dL), as compared with those with a single or no organ involvement (4.9 +/- 1.3 or 4.9 +/- 1.4 mg/dL, P < .05). The association, however, between SUA levels and multiple TOD was not confirmed in a logistic regression analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings do not support the role of SUA as an independent risk factor for subclinical TOD in a selected population of recently diagnosed uncomplicated hypertensives at low prevalence of hyperuricemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departement of Clinical Medicine and Prevention, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy. dhipertensione@libero.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17531928

Citation

Cuspidi, Cesare, et al. "Lack of Association Between Serum Uric Acid and Organ Damage in a Never-treated Essential Hypertensive Population at Low Prevalence of Hyperuricemia." American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 20, no. 6, 2007, pp. 678-85.
Cuspidi C, Valerio C, Sala C, et al. Lack of association between serum uric acid and organ damage in a never-treated essential hypertensive population at low prevalence of hyperuricemia. Am J Hypertens. 2007;20(6):678-85.
Cuspidi, C., Valerio, C., Sala, C., Meani, S., Esposito, A., Zanchetti, A., & Mancia, G. (2007). Lack of association between serum uric acid and organ damage in a never-treated essential hypertensive population at low prevalence of hyperuricemia. American Journal of Hypertension, 20(6), 678-85.
Cuspidi C, et al. Lack of Association Between Serum Uric Acid and Organ Damage in a Never-treated Essential Hypertensive Population at Low Prevalence of Hyperuricemia. Am J Hypertens. 2007;20(6):678-85. PubMed PMID: 17531928.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of association between serum uric acid and organ damage in a never-treated essential hypertensive population at low prevalence of hyperuricemia. AU - Cuspidi,Cesare, AU - Valerio,Cristiana, AU - Sala,Carla, AU - Meani,Stefano, AU - Esposito,Arturo, AU - Zanchetti,Alberto, AU - Mancia,Giuseppe, PY - 2006/10/21/received PY - 2006/11/24/revised PY - 2007/01/18/accepted PY - 2007/5/29/pubmed PY - 2007/7/27/medline PY - 2007/5/29/entrez SP - 678 EP - 85 JF - American journal of hypertension JO - Am J Hypertens VL - 20 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is still undefined whether serum uric acid (SUA) is an independent risk factor for target organ damage (TOD) and cardiovascular events in human hypertension. We sought to investigate the association of SUA with subclinical cardiac, vascular, and renal alterations in never-treated uncomplicated essential hypertensives. METHODS: A total of 580 subjects with recently diagnosed (<1 year) grade 1 and 2 hypertension, categorized by sex and tertiles of SUA levels, were considered for this analysis. All subjects underwent extensive clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonographic investigations searching for cardiac and extracardiac TOD. RESULTS: Hyperuricemia (SUA >7.0 mg/dL in men and >6 mg/dL in women) was present in 8.3% of the patients. The overall prevalence of left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), carotid alterations, and microalbuminuria was 28%, 27%, and 8%, respectively. No differences in the prevalence rates of these TOD markers were present across all SUA tertiles in the entire population, as well as in both sexes. The SUA levels were similar in patients with and without LVH, carotid alterations, or microalbuminuria. When patients were classified according to the number of organs involved, those with multiple TOD (2 or 3 organs) had significantly higher SUA levels (5.1 +/- 1.3 or 5.2 +/- 1.4 mg/dL), as compared with those with a single or no organ involvement (4.9 +/- 1.3 or 4.9 +/- 1.4 mg/dL, P < .05). The association, however, between SUA levels and multiple TOD was not confirmed in a logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings do not support the role of SUA as an independent risk factor for subclinical TOD in a selected population of recently diagnosed uncomplicated hypertensives at low prevalence of hyperuricemia. SN - 0895-7061 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17531928/Lack_of_association_between_serum_uric_acid_and_organ_damage_in_a_never_treated_essential_hypertensive_population_at_low_prevalence_of_hyperuricemia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajh/article-lookup/doi/10.1016/j.amjhyper.2007.01.013 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -