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Emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia.
Pain. 2008 Jan; 134(1-2):140-7.PAIN

Abstract

The capacity of music to soothe pain has been used in many traditional forms of medicine. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these effects have not been demonstrated. Here, we examine the possibility that the modulatory effect of music on pain is mediated by the valence (pleasant-unpleasant dimension) of the emotions induced. We report the effects of listening to pleasant and unpleasant music on thermal pain in healthy human volunteers. Eighteen participants evaluated the warmth or pain induced by 40.0, 45.5, 47.0 and 48.5 degrees C thermal stimulations applied to the skin of their forearm while listening to pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts matched for their high level of arousal (relaxing-stimulating dimension). Compared to a silent control condition, only the pleasant excerpts produced highly significant reductions in both pain intensity and unpleasantness, demonstrating the effect of positive emotions induced by music on pain (Pairwise contrasts with silence: p's<0.001). Correlation analyses in the pleasant music condition further indicated that pain decreased significantly (p's<0.05) with increases in self-reports of music pleasantness. In contrast, the unpleasant excerpts did not modulate pain significantly, and warmth perception was not affected by the presence of pleasant or unpleasant music. Those results support the hypothesis that positive emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. These findings call for the integration of music to current methods of pain control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Que, Canada H3C 3J7.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17532141

Citation

Roy, Mathieu, et al. "Emotional Valence Contributes to Music-induced Analgesia." Pain, vol. 134, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 140-7.
Roy M, Peretz I, Rainville P. Emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. Pain. 2008;134(1-2):140-7.
Roy, M., Peretz, I., & Rainville, P. (2008). Emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. Pain, 134(1-2), 140-7.
Roy M, Peretz I, Rainville P. Emotional Valence Contributes to Music-induced Analgesia. Pain. 2008;134(1-2):140-7. PubMed PMID: 17532141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. AU - Roy,Mathieu, AU - Peretz,Isabelle, AU - Rainville,Pierre, Y1 - 2007/05/25/ PY - 2006/06/22/received PY - 2007/03/02/revised PY - 2007/04/09/accepted PY - 2007/5/29/pubmed PY - 2008/3/11/medline PY - 2007/5/29/entrez SP - 140 EP - 7 JF - Pain JO - Pain VL - 134 IS - 1-2 N2 - The capacity of music to soothe pain has been used in many traditional forms of medicine. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these effects have not been demonstrated. Here, we examine the possibility that the modulatory effect of music on pain is mediated by the valence (pleasant-unpleasant dimension) of the emotions induced. We report the effects of listening to pleasant and unpleasant music on thermal pain in healthy human volunteers. Eighteen participants evaluated the warmth or pain induced by 40.0, 45.5, 47.0 and 48.5 degrees C thermal stimulations applied to the skin of their forearm while listening to pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts matched for their high level of arousal (relaxing-stimulating dimension). Compared to a silent control condition, only the pleasant excerpts produced highly significant reductions in both pain intensity and unpleasantness, demonstrating the effect of positive emotions induced by music on pain (Pairwise contrasts with silence: p's<0.001). Correlation analyses in the pleasant music condition further indicated that pain decreased significantly (p's<0.05) with increases in self-reports of music pleasantness. In contrast, the unpleasant excerpts did not modulate pain significantly, and warmth perception was not affected by the presence of pleasant or unpleasant music. Those results support the hypothesis that positive emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. These findings call for the integration of music to current methods of pain control. SN - 1872-6623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17532141/Emotional_valence_contributes_to_music_induced_analgesia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3959(07)00185-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -