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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for residual depressive symptoms.
Psychol Psychother. 2007 Jun; 80(Pt 2):193-203.PP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a new group-based intervention for prevention of relapse in recurrent depression which has not been scientifically evaluated regarding its clinical effectiveness for ameliorating residual depressive symptoms following a depressive episode. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of MBCT in reducing residual depressive symptoms in psychiatric outpatients with recurrent depression, and to particularly explore the effects of mindfulness techniques on rumination.

DESIGN

The design of this study was a mixed model complex design. Design 1 consisted of a consecutive series of patients. They were assigned to either MBCT or TAU. The independent variables were time and group allocation, and dependent variables were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Rumination Scale. In Design 2, the TAU group proceeded to complete an MBCT group, and the BDI and Rumination Scale results of the two groups were collapsed.

METHOD

Nineteen patients with residual depressive symptoms following a depressive episode, and who were attending outpatient clinic, were assigned to either MBCT or treatment as usual (TAU), with the TAU group then proceeding to complete an MBCT group. Depressive and ruminative symptoms were assessed before, during, and after treatment, and at one-month follow-up.

RESULTS

A significant reduction in depressive symptoms was found at the end of MBCT, with a further reduction at one-month follow-up. A trend towards a reduction in rumination scores was also observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Group MBCT has a marked effect on residual depressive symptoms, which may be mediated through the mindfulness-based cognitive approach towards excessive negative ruminations in patients with residual depressive symptoms following a depressive episode.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health Research, Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, Dublin, Ireland. kingstontara@yahoo.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17535594

Citation

Kingston, Tara, et al. "Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for Residual Depressive Symptoms." Psychology and Psychotherapy, vol. 80, no. Pt 2, 2007, pp. 193-203.
Kingston T, Dooley B, Bates A, et al. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for residual depressive symptoms. Psychol Psychother. 2007;80(Pt 2):193-203.
Kingston, T., Dooley, B., Bates, A., Lawlor, E., & Malone, K. (2007). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for residual depressive symptoms. Psychology and Psychotherapy, 80(Pt 2), 193-203.
Kingston T, et al. Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for Residual Depressive Symptoms. Psychol Psychother. 2007;80(Pt 2):193-203. PubMed PMID: 17535594.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for residual depressive symptoms. AU - Kingston,Tara, AU - Dooley,Barbara, AU - Bates,Anthony, AU - Lawlor,Elizabeth, AU - Malone,Kevin, PY - 2007/5/31/pubmed PY - 2007/11/7/medline PY - 2007/5/31/entrez SP - 193 EP - 203 JF - Psychology and psychotherapy JO - Psychol Psychother VL - 80 IS - Pt 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a new group-based intervention for prevention of relapse in recurrent depression which has not been scientifically evaluated regarding its clinical effectiveness for ameliorating residual depressive symptoms following a depressive episode. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of MBCT in reducing residual depressive symptoms in psychiatric outpatients with recurrent depression, and to particularly explore the effects of mindfulness techniques on rumination. DESIGN: The design of this study was a mixed model complex design. Design 1 consisted of a consecutive series of patients. They were assigned to either MBCT or TAU. The independent variables were time and group allocation, and dependent variables were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Rumination Scale. In Design 2, the TAU group proceeded to complete an MBCT group, and the BDI and Rumination Scale results of the two groups were collapsed. METHOD: Nineteen patients with residual depressive symptoms following a depressive episode, and who were attending outpatient clinic, were assigned to either MBCT or treatment as usual (TAU), with the TAU group then proceeding to complete an MBCT group. Depressive and ruminative symptoms were assessed before, during, and after treatment, and at one-month follow-up. RESULTS: A significant reduction in depressive symptoms was found at the end of MBCT, with a further reduction at one-month follow-up. A trend towards a reduction in rumination scores was also observed. CONCLUSIONS: Group MBCT has a marked effect on residual depressive symptoms, which may be mediated through the mindfulness-based cognitive approach towards excessive negative ruminations in patients with residual depressive symptoms following a depressive episode. SN - 1476-0835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17535594/Mindfulness_based_cognitive_therapy_for_residual_depressive_symptoms_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1348/147608306X116016 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -