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Tamoxifen, soy, and lifestyle factors in Asian American women with breast cancer.
J Clin Oncol. 2007 Jul 20; 25(21):3024-30.JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Soy foods have been a staple in Asia for centuries but the consumption of this food in the West is recent. Intake of soy among women at high risk for or with breast cancer has become a public health concern because genistein, a major component of soy, has weak estrogenic effects on breast epithelium, and has been found to negate the benefit of tamoxifen in some animal and in vitro studies.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional study in Asian Americans with breast cancer who were tamoxifen users (n = 380) to investigate the association between soy intake and circulating levels of tamoxifen and its metabolites (N-desmethyl tamoxifen [N-DMT], 4-hydroxytamoxifen [4-OHT], and 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen [endoxifen]).

RESULTS

Serum levels of tamoxifen or its metabolites were unrelated to self-reported intake of soy or serum levels of isoflavones. Blood levels of tamoxifen were 81% higher in postmenopausal women age 65 or older compared with premenopausal women age 45 or younger (P = .005); similar patterns of results were observed for the tamoxifen metabolites. Levels of N-DMT were 27% (P = .03) lower among women in the highest tertile of body mass index (BMI, > 24.4 kg/m2) compared with those in the lowest category (BMI 21.5). Women who used hypertensive medications had higher levels of tamoxifen (P = .02) and N-DMT (P = .04) compared with nonusers.

CONCLUSION

We found no evidence that soy intake adversely affected levels of tamoxifen or its metabolites. However, age, menopausal status, BMI, and use of hypertensive medications significantly influenced circulating levels of tamoxifen and its metabolites in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. annawu@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17536081

Citation

Wu, Anna H., et al. "Tamoxifen, Soy, and Lifestyle Factors in Asian American Women With Breast Cancer." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 25, no. 21, 2007, pp. 3024-30.
Wu AH, Pike MC, Williams LD, et al. Tamoxifen, soy, and lifestyle factors in Asian American women with breast cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2007;25(21):3024-30.
Wu, A. H., Pike, M. C., Williams, L. D., Spicer, D., Tseng, C. C., Churchwell, M. I., & Doerge, D. R. (2007). Tamoxifen, soy, and lifestyle factors in Asian American women with breast cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 25(21), 3024-30.
Wu AH, et al. Tamoxifen, Soy, and Lifestyle Factors in Asian American Women With Breast Cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2007 Jul 20;25(21):3024-30. PubMed PMID: 17536081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tamoxifen, soy, and lifestyle factors in Asian American women with breast cancer. AU - Wu,Anna H, AU - Pike,Malcolm C, AU - Williams,Lee D, AU - Spicer,Darcy, AU - Tseng,Chiu-Chen, AU - Churchwell,Mona I, AU - Doerge,Daniel R, Y1 - 2007/05/29/ PY - 2007/5/31/pubmed PY - 2007/8/23/medline PY - 2007/5/31/entrez SP - 3024 EP - 30 JF - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology JO - J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 25 IS - 21 N2 - PURPOSE: Soy foods have been a staple in Asia for centuries but the consumption of this food in the West is recent. Intake of soy among women at high risk for or with breast cancer has become a public health concern because genistein, a major component of soy, has weak estrogenic effects on breast epithelium, and has been found to negate the benefit of tamoxifen in some animal and in vitro studies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in Asian Americans with breast cancer who were tamoxifen users (n = 380) to investigate the association between soy intake and circulating levels of tamoxifen and its metabolites (N-desmethyl tamoxifen [N-DMT], 4-hydroxytamoxifen [4-OHT], and 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen [endoxifen]). RESULTS: Serum levels of tamoxifen or its metabolites were unrelated to self-reported intake of soy or serum levels of isoflavones. Blood levels of tamoxifen were 81% higher in postmenopausal women age 65 or older compared with premenopausal women age 45 or younger (P = .005); similar patterns of results were observed for the tamoxifen metabolites. Levels of N-DMT were 27% (P = .03) lower among women in the highest tertile of body mass index (BMI, > 24.4 kg/m2) compared with those in the lowest category (BMI 21.5). Women who used hypertensive medications had higher levels of tamoxifen (P = .02) and N-DMT (P = .04) compared with nonusers. CONCLUSION: We found no evidence that soy intake adversely affected levels of tamoxifen or its metabolites. However, age, menopausal status, BMI, and use of hypertensive medications significantly influenced circulating levels of tamoxifen and its metabolites in this population. SN - 1527-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17536081/Tamoxifen_soy_and_lifestyle_factors_in_Asian_American_women_with_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2006.10.5023?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -