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Iron intake in relation to diet and iron status of young adult women.
Ann Nutr Metab. 2007; 51(2):172-81.AN

Abstract

AIMS

To determine the iron intake and food sources of iron in young adult women and to compare women with high versus low iron intake on diet and iron status.

METHODS

Iron intake and food sources were assessed by a 2-day estimated food record. Iron status was determined by a fasting venous blood sample. Differences in diet and iron status between women with high versus low iron intake were examined by comparing women of the fourth respectively first quartile of total iron intake (mg/day).

RESULTS

The median total, heme and non-heme iron intake was 10.6, 0.6 and 9.8 mg/day, respectively. The median iron intake was 93 and 131% of the estimated average requirement (EAR) of the UK (11.4 mg/day) and USA (8.1 mg/day), respectively. The most important iron intake contributors were cereals and cereal products (31%), meat and meat products (12%) and vegetables (10%). Women with a high iron intake showed a significantly higher energy-adjusted intake of alcoholic beverages and soups and a lower intake of non-alcoholic beverages than women with a low iron intake. Approximately 5% of the women had anemia, of which 3% had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Almost 20% was iron-deficient non-anemic. In this regard, no significant differences were found between the iron intake quartiles.

CONCLUSION

The median iron intake in this study population is considerably below the national recommended dietary allowance (20 mg/day). However, based on the approach of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, iron intake seems to pose no major health problem when using the EAR as a reference. The number of women with IDA was indeed not alarming (3%), although 20% was iron-deficient non-anemic. The question remains whether an increase in iron intake can improve iron status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. ilse.pynaert@ugent.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17536195

Citation

Pynaert, I, et al. "Iron Intake in Relation to Diet and Iron Status of Young Adult Women." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 51, no. 2, 2007, pp. 172-81.
Pynaert I, Delanghe J, Temmerman M, et al. Iron intake in relation to diet and iron status of young adult women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):172-81.
Pynaert, I., Delanghe, J., Temmerman, M., & De Henauw, S. (2007). Iron intake in relation to diet and iron status of young adult women. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 51(2), 172-81.
Pynaert I, et al. Iron Intake in Relation to Diet and Iron Status of Young Adult Women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):172-81. PubMed PMID: 17536195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron intake in relation to diet and iron status of young adult women. AU - Pynaert,I, AU - Delanghe,J, AU - Temmerman,M, AU - De Henauw,S, Y1 - 2007/05/29/ PY - 2006/05/26/received PY - 2006/12/27/accepted PY - 2007/5/31/pubmed PY - 2007/7/21/medline PY - 2007/5/31/entrez SP - 172 EP - 81 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann Nutr Metab VL - 51 IS - 2 N2 - AIMS: To determine the iron intake and food sources of iron in young adult women and to compare women with high versus low iron intake on diet and iron status. METHODS: Iron intake and food sources were assessed by a 2-day estimated food record. Iron status was determined by a fasting venous blood sample. Differences in diet and iron status between women with high versus low iron intake were examined by comparing women of the fourth respectively first quartile of total iron intake (mg/day). RESULTS: The median total, heme and non-heme iron intake was 10.6, 0.6 and 9.8 mg/day, respectively. The median iron intake was 93 and 131% of the estimated average requirement (EAR) of the UK (11.4 mg/day) and USA (8.1 mg/day), respectively. The most important iron intake contributors were cereals and cereal products (31%), meat and meat products (12%) and vegetables (10%). Women with a high iron intake showed a significantly higher energy-adjusted intake of alcoholic beverages and soups and a lower intake of non-alcoholic beverages than women with a low iron intake. Approximately 5% of the women had anemia, of which 3% had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Almost 20% was iron-deficient non-anemic. In this regard, no significant differences were found between the iron intake quartiles. CONCLUSION: The median iron intake in this study population is considerably below the national recommended dietary allowance (20 mg/day). However, based on the approach of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, iron intake seems to pose no major health problem when using the EAR as a reference. The number of women with IDA was indeed not alarming (3%), although 20% was iron-deficient non-anemic. The question remains whether an increase in iron intake can improve iron status. SN - 1421-9697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17536195/Iron_intake_in_relation_to_diet_and_iron_status_of_young_adult_women_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000103278 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -