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Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein and cognitive function in elderly women.
Age Ageing 2007; 36(4):443-8AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Inflammation has been linked to cognitive impairment. However, limited data are available on the association between inflammatory markers and cognitive function.

OBJECTIVES

We tested the hypothesis that elevated serum concentration of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an established marker of low-grade inflammation, predicts cognitive impairment in elderly women.

DESIGN

A 12-year population-based follow-up study.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 97 women between 60 and 70 years of age at baseline.

METHODS

Serum hs-CRP concentration was measured by a high sensitivity assay. Global cognitive function was measured with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and memory and cognitive speed were measured with a detailed cognitive test battery.

RESULTS

Higher baseline hs-CRP was associated with poorer memory at 12-year follow-up without adjustment and after adjustment for age, education and depression (standardised regression coefficient beta -0.842, 95% confidence interval -1.602 to -0.083, P = 0.030), and further adjustment for the use of hormone replacement therapy, smoking, serum LDL cholesterol and body mass index (standardised regression coefficient beta -0.817, 95% confidence interval -1.630 to -0.004, P = 0.049). Memory at 12-year follow-up worsened linearly with increasing hs-CRP at baseline (P = 0.048 for linear trend). There was no association between hs-CRP at baseline and cognitive speed or MMSE score at 12-year follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

High serum hs-CRP concentration predicts poorer memory 12 years later in elderly women. Hs-CRP may be a useful biomarker to identify individuals at an increased risk for cognitive decline.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kuopio Research Institute of Exercise Medicine, Finland. Pirjo.Komulainen@uku.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17537742

Citation

Komulainen, Pirjo, et al. "Serum High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Cognitive Function in Elderly Women." Age and Ageing, vol. 36, no. 4, 2007, pp. 443-8.
Komulainen P, Lakka TA, Kivipelto M, et al. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein and cognitive function in elderly women. Age Ageing. 2007;36(4):443-8.
Komulainen, P., Lakka, T. A., Kivipelto, M., Hassinen, M., Penttilä, I. M., Helkala, E. L., ... Rauramaa, R. (2007). Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein and cognitive function in elderly women. Age and Ageing, 36(4), pp. 443-8.
Komulainen P, et al. Serum High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Cognitive Function in Elderly Women. Age Ageing. 2007;36(4):443-8. PubMed PMID: 17537742.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein and cognitive function in elderly women. AU - Komulainen,Pirjo, AU - Lakka,Timo A, AU - Kivipelto,Miia, AU - Hassinen,Maija, AU - Penttilä,Ilkka M, AU - Helkala,Eeva-Liisa, AU - Gylling,Helena, AU - Nissinen,Aulikki, AU - Rauramaa,Rainer, Y1 - 2007/05/30/ PY - 2007/6/1/pubmed PY - 2007/11/6/medline PY - 2007/6/1/entrez SP - 443 EP - 8 JF - Age and ageing JO - Age Ageing VL - 36 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Inflammation has been linked to cognitive impairment. However, limited data are available on the association between inflammatory markers and cognitive function. OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that elevated serum concentration of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an established marker of low-grade inflammation, predicts cognitive impairment in elderly women. DESIGN: A 12-year population-based follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 97 women between 60 and 70 years of age at baseline. METHODS: Serum hs-CRP concentration was measured by a high sensitivity assay. Global cognitive function was measured with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and memory and cognitive speed were measured with a detailed cognitive test battery. RESULTS: Higher baseline hs-CRP was associated with poorer memory at 12-year follow-up without adjustment and after adjustment for age, education and depression (standardised regression coefficient beta -0.842, 95% confidence interval -1.602 to -0.083, P = 0.030), and further adjustment for the use of hormone replacement therapy, smoking, serum LDL cholesterol and body mass index (standardised regression coefficient beta -0.817, 95% confidence interval -1.630 to -0.004, P = 0.049). Memory at 12-year follow-up worsened linearly with increasing hs-CRP at baseline (P = 0.048 for linear trend). There was no association between hs-CRP at baseline and cognitive speed or MMSE score at 12-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: High serum hs-CRP concentration predicts poorer memory 12 years later in elderly women. Hs-CRP may be a useful biomarker to identify individuals at an increased risk for cognitive decline. SN - 0002-0729 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17537742/Serum_high_sensitivity_C_reactive_protein_and_cognitive_function_in_elderly_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ageing/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ageing/afm051 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -