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Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk.
Nature 2007; 447(7144):562-4Nat

Abstract

Planetary systems (ours included) formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner-disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. Although the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star-forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-infrared interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-infrared emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-infrared interferometric observations that probe the gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to the dust, within one astronomical unit (1 au, the Sun-Earth distance) of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapour and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapour is probably produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. jae@astro.berkeley.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17538613

Citation

Eisner, J A.. "Water Vapour and Hydrogen in the Terrestrial-planet-forming Region of a Protoplanetary Disk." Nature, vol. 447, no. 7144, 2007, pp. 562-4.
Eisner JA. Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk. Nature. 2007;447(7144):562-4.
Eisner, J. A. (2007). Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk. Nature, 447(7144), pp. 562-4.
Eisner JA. Water Vapour and Hydrogen in the Terrestrial-planet-forming Region of a Protoplanetary Disk. Nature. 2007 May 31;447(7144):562-4. PubMed PMID: 17538613.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk. A1 - Eisner,J A, PY - 2007/01/25/received PY - 2007/04/17/accepted PY - 2007/6/1/pubmed PY - 2007/6/1/medline PY - 2007/6/1/entrez SP - 562 EP - 4 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 447 IS - 7144 N2 - Planetary systems (ours included) formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner-disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. Although the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star-forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-infrared interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-infrared emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-infrared interferometric observations that probe the gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to the dust, within one astronomical unit (1 au, the Sun-Earth distance) of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapour and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapour is probably produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17538613/Water_vapour_and_hydrogen_in_the_terrestrial_planet_forming_region_of_a_protoplanetary_disk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05867 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -