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Predictors of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunogenicity among infants and toddlers in an American Indian PnCRM7 efficacy trial.
J Infect Dis. 2007 Jul 01; 196(1):104-14.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are important for the prevention of serious illness and death among infants. Factors associated with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunogenicity have not been explored.

METHODS

Children <24 months of age received 2, 3, or 4 doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PnCRM7) or control vaccine depending on age at enrollment. Serum samples were tested for serotype-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Multiple linear regression was used to determine predictors of immunogenicity.

RESULTS

Among 315 PnCRM7-vaccinated subjects and 295 control subjects enrolled at <7 months of age, geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of antibodies were significantly higher after dose 3 than after dose 2 for all serotypes except type 4. The proportion of subjects with antibody concentrations > or =5.0 micro g/mL was higher for all serotypes, but the proportion with concentrations > or =0.35 micro g/mL was higher only for types 6B and 23F. Three-dose and 2-dose regimens for those 7-11 and 12-23 months of age, respectively, were highly immunogenic. Increased maternal antibody concentrations were associated with reduced responses to dose 1 and 3 but not to dose 4 of PnCRM7.

CONCLUSIONS

Maternal antibody is associated with a reduced infant response to PnCRM7 but does not interfere with immune memory. In infants, a third priming dose increases the antibody GMC and the proportion achieving an antibody concentration > or =5.0 micro g/mL but has little impact on the proportion achieving a concentration > or =0.35 micro g/mL.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. klobrien@jhsph.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17538890

Citation

O'Brien, Katherine L., et al. "Predictors of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Immunogenicity Among Infants and Toddlers in an American Indian PnCRM7 Efficacy Trial." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 196, no. 1, 2007, pp. 104-14.
O'Brien KL, Moisi J, Moulton LH, et al. Predictors of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunogenicity among infants and toddlers in an American Indian PnCRM7 efficacy trial. J Infect Dis. 2007;196(1):104-14.
O'Brien, K. L., Moisi, J., Moulton, L. H., Madore, D., Eick, A., Reid, R., Weatherholtz, R., Millar, E., Hu, D., Hackell, J., Kohberger, R., Siber, G., & Santosham, M. (2007). Predictors of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunogenicity among infants and toddlers in an American Indian PnCRM7 efficacy trial. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 196(1), 104-14.
O'Brien KL, et al. Predictors of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Immunogenicity Among Infants and Toddlers in an American Indian PnCRM7 Efficacy Trial. J Infect Dis. 2007 Jul 1;196(1):104-14. PubMed PMID: 17538890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictors of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunogenicity among infants and toddlers in an American Indian PnCRM7 efficacy trial. AU - O'Brien,Katherine L, AU - Moisi,Jennifer, AU - Moulton,Lawrence H, AU - Madore,Dace, AU - Eick,Angelia, AU - Reid,Ray, AU - Weatherholtz,Robert, AU - Millar,Eugene, AU - Hu,Diana, AU - Hackell,Jill, AU - Kohberger,Robert, AU - Siber,George, AU - Santosham,Mathuram, Y1 - 2007/05/24/ PY - 2006/08/30/received PY - 2006/12/21/accepted PY - 2007/6/1/pubmed PY - 2007/7/31/medline PY - 2007/6/1/entrez SP - 104 EP - 14 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 196 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are important for the prevention of serious illness and death among infants. Factors associated with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunogenicity have not been explored. METHODS: Children <24 months of age received 2, 3, or 4 doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PnCRM7) or control vaccine depending on age at enrollment. Serum samples were tested for serotype-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Multiple linear regression was used to determine predictors of immunogenicity. RESULTS: Among 315 PnCRM7-vaccinated subjects and 295 control subjects enrolled at <7 months of age, geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of antibodies were significantly higher after dose 3 than after dose 2 for all serotypes except type 4. The proportion of subjects with antibody concentrations > or =5.0 micro g/mL was higher for all serotypes, but the proportion with concentrations > or =0.35 micro g/mL was higher only for types 6B and 23F. Three-dose and 2-dose regimens for those 7-11 and 12-23 months of age, respectively, were highly immunogenic. Increased maternal antibody concentrations were associated with reduced responses to dose 1 and 3 but not to dose 4 of PnCRM7. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal antibody is associated with a reduced infant response to PnCRM7 but does not interfere with immune memory. In infants, a third priming dose increases the antibody GMC and the proportion achieving an antibody concentration > or =5.0 micro g/mL but has little impact on the proportion achieving a concentration > or =0.35 micro g/mL. SN - 0022-1899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17538890/Predictors_of_pneumococcal_conjugate_vaccine_immunogenicity_among_infants_and_toddlers_in_an_American_Indian_PnCRM7_efficacy_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/518438 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -