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Sleep health New South Wales: chronic sleep restriction and daytime sleepiness.
Intern Med J. 2008 Jan; 38(1):24-31.IM

Abstract

AIMS

The aim of this study was to provide the first population-based descriptions of typical sleep duration and the prevalence of chronic sleep restriction and chronic sleepiness in community-dwelling Australian adults.

METHODS

Ten thousand subjects randomly selected from the New South Wales electoral roll, half aged 18-24 years and the other half aged 25-64 years were posted a questionnaire asking about sleep behaviour, sleepiness and sleep disorders.

RESULTS

Responses were received from 3300 subjects (35.6% response rate). The mean +/- standard deviation of sleep duration was 7.25 +/- 1.48 h/night during the week and 7.53 +/- 2.01 h/night in the weekends. Of the working age group, 18.4% reported sleeping less than 6.5 h/night. Chronic daytime sleepiness was present in 11.7%. Logistic modelling indicated that the independent risk factors for excessive daytime sleepiness were being older, sleeping less than 6.5 h per night during the week, getting qualitatively insufficient sleep, having at least one symptom of insomnia and lacking enthusiasm (marker of depression).

CONCLUSION

In New South Wales almost one-fifth of the people are chronically sleep restricted and 11.7% are chronically sleepy. Chronic sleepiness was most commonly associated with voluntarily short sleep durations and symptoms of insomnia and depression. If the experimentally observed health effects of sleep restriction also operate at a population level, this prevalence of chronic sleep restriction is likely to have a significant influence on public health in Australia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Woolcock Institute of Medical Research and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Centre for Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. delwynb@mail.med.usyd.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17543000

Citation

Bartlett, D J., et al. "Sleep Health New South Wales: Chronic Sleep Restriction and Daytime Sleepiness." Internal Medicine Journal, vol. 38, no. 1, 2008, pp. 24-31.
Bartlett DJ, Marshall NS, Williams A, et al. Sleep health New South Wales: chronic sleep restriction and daytime sleepiness. Intern Med J. 2008;38(1):24-31.
Bartlett, D. J., Marshall, N. S., Williams, A., & Grunstein, R. R. (2008). Sleep health New South Wales: chronic sleep restriction and daytime sleepiness. Internal Medicine Journal, 38(1), 24-31.
Bartlett DJ, et al. Sleep Health New South Wales: Chronic Sleep Restriction and Daytime Sleepiness. Intern Med J. 2008;38(1):24-31. PubMed PMID: 17543000.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep health New South Wales: chronic sleep restriction and daytime sleepiness. AU - Bartlett,D J, AU - Marshall,N S, AU - Williams,A, AU - Grunstein,R R, Y1 - 2007/06/02/ PY - 2007/6/5/pubmed PY - 2008/2/7/medline PY - 2007/6/5/entrez SP - 24 EP - 31 JF - Internal medicine journal JO - Intern Med J VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: The aim of this study was to provide the first population-based descriptions of typical sleep duration and the prevalence of chronic sleep restriction and chronic sleepiness in community-dwelling Australian adults. METHODS: Ten thousand subjects randomly selected from the New South Wales electoral roll, half aged 18-24 years and the other half aged 25-64 years were posted a questionnaire asking about sleep behaviour, sleepiness and sleep disorders. RESULTS: Responses were received from 3300 subjects (35.6% response rate). The mean +/- standard deviation of sleep duration was 7.25 +/- 1.48 h/night during the week and 7.53 +/- 2.01 h/night in the weekends. Of the working age group, 18.4% reported sleeping less than 6.5 h/night. Chronic daytime sleepiness was present in 11.7%. Logistic modelling indicated that the independent risk factors for excessive daytime sleepiness were being older, sleeping less than 6.5 h per night during the week, getting qualitatively insufficient sleep, having at least one symptom of insomnia and lacking enthusiasm (marker of depression). CONCLUSION: In New South Wales almost one-fifth of the people are chronically sleep restricted and 11.7% are chronically sleepy. Chronic sleepiness was most commonly associated with voluntarily short sleep durations and symptoms of insomnia and depression. If the experimentally observed health effects of sleep restriction also operate at a population level, this prevalence of chronic sleep restriction is likely to have a significant influence on public health in Australia. SN - 1445-5994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17543000/Sleep_health_New_South_Wales:_chronic_sleep_restriction_and_daytime_sleepiness_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1445-5994.2007.01395.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -