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Are we sensitive to valence differences in emotionally negative stimuli? Electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study.
Neuropsychologia. 2007 Sep 20; 45(12):2764-71.N

Abstract

The present study investigated whether the human brain is sensitive to valence differences in emotionally negative stimuli by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) for extremely negative (EN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures while subjects perform a standard/deviant categorization task, irrespective of the emotional valence of the deviants. Using the same design, we also investigated the sensitivity of the human brain to valence differences in emotionally positive stimuli. Experiment 1 showed that EN stimuli elicited more negative deflections than MN stimuli in the early P2 and N2, later P3, and slow negative wave (SNW) components. In contrast, there were no differences in amplitude or latency in these components during the extremely positive (EP) and moderately positive (MP) conditions of Experiment 2. This suggests that humans are only sensitive to valence differences in negative stimuli, and that these negative valences could be processed differentially throughout the information processing stream even when individuals are highly engaged in a non-emotional task.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (SWU), Ministry of Education, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17548095

Citation

Yuan, Jiajin, et al. "Are We Sensitive to Valence Differences in Emotionally Negative Stimuli? Electrophysiological Evidence From an ERP Study." Neuropsychologia, vol. 45, no. 12, 2007, pp. 2764-71.
Yuan J, Zhang Q, Chen A, et al. Are we sensitive to valence differences in emotionally negative stimuli? Electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study. Neuropsychologia. 2007;45(12):2764-71.
Yuan, J., Zhang, Q., Chen, A., Li, H., Wang, Q., Zhuang, Z., & Jia, S. (2007). Are we sensitive to valence differences in emotionally negative stimuli? Electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study. Neuropsychologia, 45(12), 2764-71.
Yuan J, et al. Are We Sensitive to Valence Differences in Emotionally Negative Stimuli? Electrophysiological Evidence From an ERP Study. Neuropsychologia. 2007 Sep 20;45(12):2764-71. PubMed PMID: 17548095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are we sensitive to valence differences in emotionally negative stimuli? Electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study. AU - Yuan,Jiajin, AU - Zhang,Qinglin, AU - Chen,Antao, AU - Li,Hong, AU - Wang,Quanhong, AU - Zhuang,Zhongchunxiao, AU - Jia,Shiwei, Y1 - 2007/04/27/ PY - 2006/12/02/received PY - 2007/04/06/revised PY - 2007/04/17/accepted PY - 2007/6/6/pubmed PY - 2007/10/27/medline PY - 2007/6/6/entrez SP - 2764 EP - 71 JF - Neuropsychologia JO - Neuropsychologia VL - 45 IS - 12 N2 - The present study investigated whether the human brain is sensitive to valence differences in emotionally negative stimuli by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) for extremely negative (EN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures while subjects perform a standard/deviant categorization task, irrespective of the emotional valence of the deviants. Using the same design, we also investigated the sensitivity of the human brain to valence differences in emotionally positive stimuli. Experiment 1 showed that EN stimuli elicited more negative deflections than MN stimuli in the early P2 and N2, later P3, and slow negative wave (SNW) components. In contrast, there were no differences in amplitude or latency in these components during the extremely positive (EP) and moderately positive (MP) conditions of Experiment 2. This suggests that humans are only sensitive to valence differences in negative stimuli, and that these negative valences could be processed differentially throughout the information processing stream even when individuals are highly engaged in a non-emotional task. SN - 0028-3932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17548095/Are_we_sensitive_to_valence_differences_in_emotionally_negative_stimuli_Electrophysiological_evidence_from_an_ERP_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3932(07)00165-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -