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Supplemental and dietary vitamin E intakes and risk of prostate cancer in a large prospective study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2007; 16(6):1128-35CE

Abstract

Supplemental vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) has been linked to lower prostate cancer incidence in one randomized trial and several, although not all, observational studies. The evidence regarding dietary intake of individual vitamin E isoforms and prostate cancer is limited and inconclusive, however. We prospectively examined the relations of supplemental vitamin E and dietary intakes of alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta- tocopherols to prostate cancer risk among 295,344 men, ages 50 to 71 years and cancer-free at enrollment in 1995 to 1996, in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. At baseline, participants completed a questionnaire that captured information on diet, supplement use, and other factors. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of prostate cancer. During 5 years of follow-up, 10,241 incident prostate cancers were identified. Supplemental vitamin E intake was not related to prostate cancer risk (for >0-99, 100-199, 200-399, 400-799, and > or = 800 IU/d versus never use: RR, 0.97, 0.89, 1.03, 0.99, and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.87-1.07) respectively; Ptrend = 0.90). However, dietary gamma-tocopherol, the most commonly consumed form of vitamin E in the United States, was significantly inversely related to the risk of advanced prostate cancer (for highest versus lowest quintile: RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.84; Ptrend = 0.001). These results suggest that supplemental vitamin E does not protect against prostate cancer, but that increased consumption of gamma-tocopherol from foods is associated with a reduced risk of clinically relevant disease. The potential benefit of gamma-tocopherol for prostate cancer prevention deserves further attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisions of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. mewright@uic.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17548674

Citation

Wright, Margaret E., et al. "Supplemental and Dietary Vitamin E Intakes and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Large Prospective Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 16, no. 6, 2007, pp. 1128-35.
Wright ME, Weinstein SJ, Lawson KA, et al. Supplemental and dietary vitamin E intakes and risk of prostate cancer in a large prospective study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007;16(6):1128-35.
Wright, M. E., Weinstein, S. J., Lawson, K. A., Albanes, D., Subar, A. F., Dixon, L. B., ... Leitzmann, M. F. (2007). Supplemental and dietary vitamin E intakes and risk of prostate cancer in a large prospective study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 16(6), pp. 1128-35.
Wright ME, et al. Supplemental and Dietary Vitamin E Intakes and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Large Prospective Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007;16(6):1128-35. PubMed PMID: 17548674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Supplemental and dietary vitamin E intakes and risk of prostate cancer in a large prospective study. AU - Wright,Margaret E, AU - Weinstein,Stephanie J, AU - Lawson,Karla A, AU - Albanes,Demetrius, AU - Subar,Amy F, AU - Dixon,L Beth, AU - Mouw,Traci, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, PY - 2007/6/6/pubmed PY - 2007/10/4/medline PY - 2007/6/6/entrez SP - 1128 EP - 35 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 16 IS - 6 N2 - Supplemental vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) has been linked to lower prostate cancer incidence in one randomized trial and several, although not all, observational studies. The evidence regarding dietary intake of individual vitamin E isoforms and prostate cancer is limited and inconclusive, however. We prospectively examined the relations of supplemental vitamin E and dietary intakes of alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta- tocopherols to prostate cancer risk among 295,344 men, ages 50 to 71 years and cancer-free at enrollment in 1995 to 1996, in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. At baseline, participants completed a questionnaire that captured information on diet, supplement use, and other factors. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of prostate cancer. During 5 years of follow-up, 10,241 incident prostate cancers were identified. Supplemental vitamin E intake was not related to prostate cancer risk (for >0-99, 100-199, 200-399, 400-799, and > or = 800 IU/d versus never use: RR, 0.97, 0.89, 1.03, 0.99, and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.87-1.07) respectively; Ptrend = 0.90). However, dietary gamma-tocopherol, the most commonly consumed form of vitamin E in the United States, was significantly inversely related to the risk of advanced prostate cancer (for highest versus lowest quintile: RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.84; Ptrend = 0.001). These results suggest that supplemental vitamin E does not protect against prostate cancer, but that increased consumption of gamma-tocopherol from foods is associated with a reduced risk of clinically relevant disease. The potential benefit of gamma-tocopherol for prostate cancer prevention deserves further attention. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17548674/Supplemental_and_dietary_vitamin_E_intakes_and_risk_of_prostate_cancer_in_a_large_prospective_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17548674 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -