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Combined treatment with sertraline and liothyronine in major depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jun; 64(6):679-88.AG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Antidepressant treatments that achieve a higher remission rate than those currently available are urgently needed. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine may potentiate antidepressant effects.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the antidepressant efficacy and safety of liothyronine sodium (triiodothyronine) when administered concurrently with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline hydrochloride to patients with major depressive disorder.

DESIGN

Double-blind, randomized, 8-week, placebo-controlled trial.

SETTING

Outpatient referral centers.

PATIENTS

A total of 124 adult outpatients meeting unmodified DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder without psychotic features.

INTERVENTIONS

Patients were randomized to receive sertraline hydrochloride (50 mg/d for 1 week; 100 mg/d thereafter) plus liothyronine sodium (20-25 microg/d for 1 week; 40-50 microg/d thereafter) or sertraline plus placebo for 8 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The primary outcome measure was categorical response to treatment (> or =50% decrease in scores on the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression from baseline to study end point). Remission rate (final Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score, < or =6) was a secondary outcome measure.

RESULTS

Intent-to-treat Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression response rates were 70% and 50% in the sertraline-liothyronine and sertraline-placebo groups, respectively (P = .02; odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-7.35); remission rates were 58% with sertraline-liothyronine and 38% with sertraline-placebo (P = .02; odds ratio, 2.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-6.49). Baseline T(3) values were lower in patients treated with sertraline-liothyronine who had remissions than in those without remissions (t(48) = 3.36; P<.002). Among patients treated with sertraline-liothyronine, remission was associated with a significant decrease in serum thyrotropin values (F(1,73) = 4.00; P<.05). There were no significant effects of liothyronine supplementation on frequency of adverse effects.

CONCLUSIONS

These results demonstrate enhancement of the antidepressant effect of sertraline by concurrent treatment with liothyronine without a significant increase in adverse effects. The antidepressant effect of liothyronine may be directly linked to thyroid function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem 91120, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17548749

Citation

Cooper-Kazaz, Rena, et al. "Combined Treatment With Sertraline and Liothyronine in Major Depression: a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial." Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 64, no. 6, 2007, pp. 679-88.
Cooper-Kazaz R, Apter JT, Cohen R, et al. Combined treatment with sertraline and liothyronine in major depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007;64(6):679-88.
Cooper-Kazaz, R., Apter, J. T., Cohen, R., Karagichev, L., Muhammed-Moussa, S., Grupper, D., Drori, T., Newman, M. E., Sackeim, H. A., Glaser, B., & Lerer, B. (2007). Combined treatment with sertraline and liothyronine in major depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 64(6), 679-88.
Cooper-Kazaz R, et al. Combined Treatment With Sertraline and Liothyronine in Major Depression: a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007;64(6):679-88. PubMed PMID: 17548749.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Combined treatment with sertraline and liothyronine in major depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. AU - Cooper-Kazaz,Rena, AU - Apter,Jeffrey T, AU - Cohen,Revital, AU - Karagichev,Leonid, AU - Muhammed-Moussa,Said, AU - Grupper,Daniel, AU - Drori,Taly, AU - Newman,Michael E, AU - Sackeim,Harold A, AU - Glaser,Benjamin, AU - Lerer,Bernard, PY - 2007/6/6/pubmed PY - 2007/7/4/medline PY - 2007/6/6/entrez SP - 679 EP - 88 JF - Archives of general psychiatry JO - Arch. Gen. Psychiatry VL - 64 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Antidepressant treatments that achieve a higher remission rate than those currently available are urgently needed. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine may potentiate antidepressant effects. OBJECTIVE: To determine the antidepressant efficacy and safety of liothyronine sodium (triiodothyronine) when administered concurrently with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline hydrochloride to patients with major depressive disorder. DESIGN: Double-blind, randomized, 8-week, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Outpatient referral centers. PATIENTS: A total of 124 adult outpatients meeting unmodified DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder without psychotic features. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to receive sertraline hydrochloride (50 mg/d for 1 week; 100 mg/d thereafter) plus liothyronine sodium (20-25 microg/d for 1 week; 40-50 microg/d thereafter) or sertraline plus placebo for 8 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was categorical response to treatment (> or =50% decrease in scores on the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression from baseline to study end point). Remission rate (final Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score, < or =6) was a secondary outcome measure. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression response rates were 70% and 50% in the sertraline-liothyronine and sertraline-placebo groups, respectively (P = .02; odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-7.35); remission rates were 58% with sertraline-liothyronine and 38% with sertraline-placebo (P = .02; odds ratio, 2.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-6.49). Baseline T(3) values were lower in patients treated with sertraline-liothyronine who had remissions than in those without remissions (t(48) = 3.36; P<.002). Among patients treated with sertraline-liothyronine, remission was associated with a significant decrease in serum thyrotropin values (F(1,73) = 4.00; P<.05). There were no significant effects of liothyronine supplementation on frequency of adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate enhancement of the antidepressant effect of sertraline by concurrent treatment with liothyronine without a significant increase in adverse effects. The antidepressant effect of liothyronine may be directly linked to thyroid function. SN - 0003-990X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17548749/Combined_treatment_with_sertraline_and_liothyronine_in_major_depression:_a_randomized_double_blind_placebo_controlled_trial_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=17548749.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -