Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study.
Cancer Causes Control 2007; 18(7):775-82CC

Abstract

Vitamin D, a prosteroid hormone with anti-proliferative and pro-differentiation activity, is thought to act as a cancer chemopreventive agent. This study evaluated the association between vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk among women in a large prospective cohort study. A total of 34,321 postmenopausal women who had completed a questionnaire that included diet and supplement use were followed for breast cancer incidence from 1986 to 2004. Adjusted relative risks (RR) for breast cancer were calculated for dietary, supplemental, and total vitamin D intake among all women. The adjusted RR of breast cancer for women consuming >800 IU/day versus <400 IU/day total vitamin D was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.77-1.03). RRs were stronger among women with negative than positive ER or PR status. The association of high vitamin D intake with breast cancer was strongest in the first 5 years after baseline dietary assessment (RR = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.46-0.94 compared with lowest-intake group), and diminished over time. Changes in vitamin D intake over time might have contributed to the diminished association observed in later years. Vitamin D intake of >800 IU/day appears to be associated with a small decrease in risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. Studies evaluating all sources of vitamin D, especially sun exposure, are needed to fully understand the association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, 1300 S. Second St., Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. robien@epi.umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17549593

Citation

Robien, Kim, et al. "Vitamin D Intake and Breast Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Women: the Iowa Women's Health Study." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 18, no. 7, 2007, pp. 775-82.
Robien K, Cutler GJ, Lazovich D. Vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2007;18(7):775-82.
Robien, K., Cutler, G. J., & Lazovich, D. (2007). Vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 18(7), pp. 775-82.
Robien K, Cutler GJ, Lazovich D. Vitamin D Intake and Breast Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2007;18(7):775-82. PubMed PMID: 17549593.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. AU - Robien,Kim, AU - Cutler,Gretchen J, AU - Lazovich,DeAnn, Y1 - 2007/06/05/ PY - 2007/02/24/received PY - 2007/05/07/accepted PY - 2007/6/6/pubmed PY - 2007/8/30/medline PY - 2007/6/6/entrez SP - 775 EP - 82 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 18 IS - 7 N2 - Vitamin D, a prosteroid hormone with anti-proliferative and pro-differentiation activity, is thought to act as a cancer chemopreventive agent. This study evaluated the association between vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk among women in a large prospective cohort study. A total of 34,321 postmenopausal women who had completed a questionnaire that included diet and supplement use were followed for breast cancer incidence from 1986 to 2004. Adjusted relative risks (RR) for breast cancer were calculated for dietary, supplemental, and total vitamin D intake among all women. The adjusted RR of breast cancer for women consuming >800 IU/day versus <400 IU/day total vitamin D was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.77-1.03). RRs were stronger among women with negative than positive ER or PR status. The association of high vitamin D intake with breast cancer was strongest in the first 5 years after baseline dietary assessment (RR = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.46-0.94 compared with lowest-intake group), and diminished over time. Changes in vitamin D intake over time might have contributed to the diminished association observed in later years. Vitamin D intake of >800 IU/day appears to be associated with a small decrease in risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. Studies evaluating all sources of vitamin D, especially sun exposure, are needed to fully understand the association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17549593/Vitamin_D_intake_and_breast_cancer_risk_in_postmenopausal_women:_the_Iowa_Women's_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-007-9020-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -