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Bacteremia, fever, and splenomegaly caused by a newly recognized bartonella species.
N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 07; 356(23):2381-7.NEJM

Abstract

Bartonella species cause serious human infections globally, including bacillary angiomatosis, Oroya fever, trench fever, and endocarditis. We describe a patient who had fever and splenomegaly after traveling to Peru and also had bacteremia from an organism that resembled Bartonella bacilliformis, the causative agent of Oroya fever, which is endemic to Peru. However, genetic analyses revealed that this fastidious bacterium represented a previously uncultured and unnamed bartonella species, closely related to B. clarridgeiae and more distantly related to B. bacilliformis. We characterized this isolate, including its ability to cause fever and sustained bacteremia in a rhesus macaque. The route of infection and burden of human disease associated with this newly described pathogen are currently unknown.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17554119

Citation

Eremeeva, Marina E., et al. "Bacteremia, Fever, and Splenomegaly Caused By a Newly Recognized Bartonella Species." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 356, no. 23, 2007, pp. 2381-7.
Eremeeva ME, Gerns HL, Lydy SL, et al. Bacteremia, fever, and splenomegaly caused by a newly recognized bartonella species. N Engl J Med. 2007;356(23):2381-7.
Eremeeva, M. E., Gerns, H. L., Lydy, S. L., Goo, J. S., Ryan, E. T., Mathew, S. S., Ferraro, M. J., Holden, J. M., Nicholson, W. L., Dasch, G. A., & Koehler, J. E. (2007). Bacteremia, fever, and splenomegaly caused by a newly recognized bartonella species. The New England Journal of Medicine, 356(23), 2381-7.
Eremeeva ME, et al. Bacteremia, Fever, and Splenomegaly Caused By a Newly Recognized Bartonella Species. N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2381-7. PubMed PMID: 17554119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bacteremia, fever, and splenomegaly caused by a newly recognized bartonella species. AU - Eremeeva,Marina E, AU - Gerns,Helen L, AU - Lydy,Shari L, AU - Goo,Jeanna S, AU - Ryan,Edward T, AU - Mathew,Smitha S, AU - Ferraro,Mary Jane, AU - Holden,Judith M, AU - Nicholson,William L, AU - Dasch,Gregory A, AU - Koehler,Jane E, PY - 2007/6/8/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/6/8/entrez SP - 2381 EP - 7 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N Engl J Med VL - 356 IS - 23 N2 - Bartonella species cause serious human infections globally, including bacillary angiomatosis, Oroya fever, trench fever, and endocarditis. We describe a patient who had fever and splenomegaly after traveling to Peru and also had bacteremia from an organism that resembled Bartonella bacilliformis, the causative agent of Oroya fever, which is endemic to Peru. However, genetic analyses revealed that this fastidious bacterium represented a previously uncultured and unnamed bartonella species, closely related to B. clarridgeiae and more distantly related to B. bacilliformis. We characterized this isolate, including its ability to cause fever and sustained bacteremia in a rhesus macaque. The route of infection and burden of human disease associated with this newly described pathogen are currently unknown. SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17554119/full_citation L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa065987?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -