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[Analysis of children's nutritional status based on WHO children growth standard in China].
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2007 Mar; 36(2):203-6.WS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare children's growth patterns and estimates of malnutrition using the WHO standards versus the NCHS reference in China.

METHODS

Data originated from China children nutrition surveillance in 2005, Z-scores and prevalence of malnutrition were compared between standards.

RESULTS

There was substantial difference in Z-scores between standards in rural (P < 0.0001). According to the WHO standards, prevalence of underweight in rural was lower than that of underweight based on the NCHS reference (6.1% . vs. 8.6%, P < 0.0001). Except for children under 6 months, all age groups underweight rates were lower according to the WHO standards. Prevalence of stunting in rural was higher based on the WHO standards (16.3% . vs. 13.0%, P < 0.0001), prevalences of stunting under 6 months were 2.1 times of that based on NCHS reference. As for wasting, there were no differences between standards, but wasting was substantially higher during the first half of infancy. Overweight rates based on the WHO standards were higher than those based on NCHS reference in urban (6.7% . vs. 5.4%, P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION

In comparison with NCHS reference, population estimates of malnutrition would vary by age, growth indicator based on WHO standards. The WHO standards could provide a better tool to monitor the rapid and changing rate of growth in early infancy, further analysis on existing data was needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

chi

PubMed ID

17555102

Citation

Wang, Yuying, et al. "[Analysis of Children's Nutritional Status Based On WHO Children Growth Standard in China]." Wei Sheng Yan Jiu = Journal of Hygiene Research, vol. 36, no. 2, 2007, pp. 203-6.
Wang Y, Chen C, He W. [Analysis of children's nutritional status based on WHO children growth standard in China]. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2007;36(2):203-6.
Wang, Y., Chen, C., & He, W. (2007). [Analysis of children's nutritional status based on WHO children growth standard in China]. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu = Journal of Hygiene Research, 36(2), 203-6.
Wang Y, Chen C, He W. [Analysis of Children's Nutritional Status Based On WHO Children Growth Standard in China]. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2007;36(2):203-6. PubMed PMID: 17555102.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Analysis of children's nutritional status based on WHO children growth standard in China]. AU - Wang,Yuying, AU - Chen,Chunming, AU - He,Wu, PY - 2007/6/9/pubmed PY - 2010/8/20/medline PY - 2007/6/9/entrez SP - 203 EP - 6 JF - Wei sheng yan jiu = Journal of hygiene research JO - Wei Sheng Yan Jiu VL - 36 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare children's growth patterns and estimates of malnutrition using the WHO standards versus the NCHS reference in China. METHODS: Data originated from China children nutrition surveillance in 2005, Z-scores and prevalence of malnutrition were compared between standards. RESULTS: There was substantial difference in Z-scores between standards in rural (P < 0.0001). According to the WHO standards, prevalence of underweight in rural was lower than that of underweight based on the NCHS reference (6.1% . vs. 8.6%, P < 0.0001). Except for children under 6 months, all age groups underweight rates were lower according to the WHO standards. Prevalence of stunting in rural was higher based on the WHO standards (16.3% . vs. 13.0%, P < 0.0001), prevalences of stunting under 6 months were 2.1 times of that based on NCHS reference. As for wasting, there were no differences between standards, but wasting was substantially higher during the first half of infancy. Overweight rates based on the WHO standards were higher than those based on NCHS reference in urban (6.7% . vs. 5.4%, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In comparison with NCHS reference, population estimates of malnutrition would vary by age, growth indicator based on WHO standards. The WHO standards could provide a better tool to monitor the rapid and changing rate of growth in early infancy, further analysis on existing data was needed. SN - 1000-8020 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17555102/[Analysis_of_children's_nutritional_status_based_on_WHO_children_growth_standard_in_China]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/toddlerdevelopment.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -