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Decline in breast cancer incidence--United States, 1999-2003.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Jun 08; 56(22):549-53.MM

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among females in the United States. The 2006 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer described a stabilization in female breast cancer incidence rates during 2001-2003, ending increases that began in the 1980s, and a decline in the number of breast cancer cases diagnosed in 2003. In addition, researchers who used 1990-2003 data from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, representing approximately 14% of the U.S. population, reported a 7% decrease in invasive breast cancer rates from 2002 to 2003. To further assess breast cancer annual incidence rates during 1999-2003, CDC analyzed data collected by CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the NCI SEER program. These combined data account for approximately 86% of the U.S. population. The results of this analysis indicated that age-adjusted incidence rates for invasive breast cancer decreased each year during 1999-2003, with the greatest decrease (6.1%) occurring from 2002 to 2003; women aged > or = 50 years experienced a significant decrease during this period. Rates of in situ (i.e., noninvasive) breast cancer increased each year during 1999-2002 and then decreased from 2002 to 2003; women aged 50-79 years experienced a significant decrease during this period. Future studies should focus on determining potential causes for these decreases.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17557070

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Decline in Breast Cancer incidence--United States, 1999-2003." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 56, no. 22, 2007, pp. 549-53.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Decline in breast cancer incidence--United States, 1999-2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007;56(22):549-53.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2007). Decline in breast cancer incidence--United States, 1999-2003. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 56(22), 549-53.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Decline in Breast Cancer incidence--United States, 1999-2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Jun 8;56(22):549-53. PubMed PMID: 17557070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Decline in breast cancer incidence--United States, 1999-2003. A1 - ,, PY - 2007/6/9/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/6/9/entrez SP - 549 EP - 53 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. VL - 56 IS - 22 N2 - Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among females in the United States. The 2006 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer described a stabilization in female breast cancer incidence rates during 2001-2003, ending increases that began in the 1980s, and a decline in the number of breast cancer cases diagnosed in 2003. In addition, researchers who used 1990-2003 data from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, representing approximately 14% of the U.S. population, reported a 7% decrease in invasive breast cancer rates from 2002 to 2003. To further assess breast cancer annual incidence rates during 1999-2003, CDC analyzed data collected by CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the NCI SEER program. These combined data account for approximately 86% of the U.S. population. The results of this analysis indicated that age-adjusted incidence rates for invasive breast cancer decreased each year during 1999-2003, with the greatest decrease (6.1%) occurring from 2002 to 2003; women aged > or = 50 years experienced a significant decrease during this period. Rates of in situ (i.e., noninvasive) breast cancer increased each year during 1999-2002 and then decreased from 2002 to 2003; women aged 50-79 years experienced a significant decrease during this period. Future studies should focus on determining potential causes for these decreases. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17557070/Decline_in_breast_cancer_incidence__United_States_1999_2003_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5622a1.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -