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Comorbidity and use of health-care services among irritable bowel syndrome sufferers.
Scand J Gastroenterol 2007; 42(7):799-806SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have more somatic and psychiatric comorbidity and use more health-care services for comorbid conditions than do other patients. Little is known about the frequency of comorbid symptoms among IBS sufferers in the general population and their influence on use of health-care facilities. The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of somatic and psychiatric symptoms between IBS sufferers and controls in the general population, and to study how comorbidity rates are distributed among consulters and non-consulters and how they predict the use of health care-services.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

By means of a questionnaire sent to 5000 randomly selected adults IBS was identified according to the Rome II criteria. The questionnaire also covered upper GI symptoms, non-GI somatic symptoms, depression and anxiety. A logistic regression analysis with 26 variables was carried out to determine the independent predictors of health-care seeking for GI and non-GI complaints.

RESULTS

The response rate was 73% and prevalence of IBS 5.1% (95% CI 4.4-5.8%). Dyspeptic symptoms, somatic extra-GI symptoms and psychiatric symptoms were reported by 45%, 69% and 51% of IBS sufferers, respectively, and 6%, 35% and 27%, of controls, respectively. Visiting a physician because of GI complaints was associated with disturbing abdominal symptoms, but not with depression or anxiety. Of the present GI conditions, only dyspeptic symptoms were associated with an increased consultation rate also for non-GI complaints.

CONCLUSIONS

In the general population, both IBS consulters and non-consulters demonstrate high rates of comorbidity. Seeking health care for abdominal complaints is associated with abdominal symptoms rather than psychiatric comorbidity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hus, Finland. markku.hillila@hus.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17558902

Citation

Hillilä, Markku T., et al. "Comorbidity and Use of Health-care Services Among Irritable Bowel Syndrome Sufferers." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 42, no. 7, 2007, pp. 799-806.
Hillilä MT, Siivola MT, Färkkilä MA. Comorbidity and use of health-care services among irritable bowel syndrome sufferers. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2007;42(7):799-806.
Hillilä, M. T., Siivola, M. T., & Färkkilä, M. A. (2007). Comorbidity and use of health-care services among irritable bowel syndrome sufferers. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 42(7), pp. 799-806.
Hillilä MT, Siivola MT, Färkkilä MA. Comorbidity and Use of Health-care Services Among Irritable Bowel Syndrome Sufferers. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2007;42(7):799-806. PubMed PMID: 17558902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comorbidity and use of health-care services among irritable bowel syndrome sufferers. AU - Hillilä,Markku T, AU - Siivola,Matti T, AU - Färkkilä,Martti A, PY - 2007/6/15/pubmed PY - 2007/8/25/medline PY - 2007/6/15/entrez SP - 799 EP - 806 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 42 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have more somatic and psychiatric comorbidity and use more health-care services for comorbid conditions than do other patients. Little is known about the frequency of comorbid symptoms among IBS sufferers in the general population and their influence on use of health-care facilities. The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of somatic and psychiatric symptoms between IBS sufferers and controls in the general population, and to study how comorbidity rates are distributed among consulters and non-consulters and how they predict the use of health care-services. MATERIAL AND METHODS: By means of a questionnaire sent to 5000 randomly selected adults IBS was identified according to the Rome II criteria. The questionnaire also covered upper GI symptoms, non-GI somatic symptoms, depression and anxiety. A logistic regression analysis with 26 variables was carried out to determine the independent predictors of health-care seeking for GI and non-GI complaints. RESULTS: The response rate was 73% and prevalence of IBS 5.1% (95% CI 4.4-5.8%). Dyspeptic symptoms, somatic extra-GI symptoms and psychiatric symptoms were reported by 45%, 69% and 51% of IBS sufferers, respectively, and 6%, 35% and 27%, of controls, respectively. Visiting a physician because of GI complaints was associated with disturbing abdominal symptoms, but not with depression or anxiety. Of the present GI conditions, only dyspeptic symptoms were associated with an increased consultation rate also for non-GI complaints. CONCLUSIONS: In the general population, both IBS consulters and non-consulters demonstrate high rates of comorbidity. Seeking health care for abdominal complaints is associated with abdominal symptoms rather than psychiatric comorbidity. SN - 0036-5521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17558902/Comorbidity_and_use_of_health_care_services_among_irritable_bowel_syndrome_sufferers_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365520601113927 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -