Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of a weight-loss program on mental stress-induced cardiovascular responses and recovery.
Nutrition. 2007 Jul-Aug; 23(7-8):521-8.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We assessed the effect of weight loss on blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate during rest, psychological stress, and recovery after stress.

METHODS

Two groups of men completed two mental stress tests 12 wk apart. The control group continued their usual diet, whereas the weight-loss group underwent a dietary weight-loss program in which they were randomized to a high-fruit/vegetable and low-fat dairy diet or a low-fat diet.

RESULTS

Fifty-five men with a baseline BP of 125.9 +/- 6.9/83.6 +/- 7.1 mmHg (mean +/- SD) completed the study (weight-loss group, n = 28; control group, n = 27). The weight-loss group lost weight (mean +/- SEM, -4.3 +/- 0.3 versus +0.4 +/- 0.4 kg, P = 0.001) compared with controls and had a significant decrease in resting systolic BP (SBP; -2.0 +/- 1.1% versus +2.0 +/- 1.1%, P < 0.05). There was a greater decrease in SBP (P < 0.05) and pulse rate (P < 0.05) at all time points during the stress test in the weight loss compared with the control group. At week 12, SBP in 23 (82%) subjects in the weight-loss group and 24 (89%) in the control group returned to resting levels, with recovering levels in the weight-loss group returning to resting levels 6.1 +/- 2.6 min earlier than in the control group (P < 0.05). There was an overall greater decrease in diastolic BP (DBP; P < 0.05) and DBP during recovery up to 27 min after stress (P < 0.05) in the high-fruit/vegetable and low-fat dairy diet group (n = 14) compared with the low-fat diet group (n = 14).

CONCLUSION

A 5% loss of weight decreased BP during rest and returned SBP to resting levels faster, thus decreasing the period of increased BP as a result of mental stress, which is likely to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease in the long term.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Australia. sjtor@deakin.edu.auNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17560080

Citation

Torres, Susan J., and Caryl A. Nowson. "Effect of a Weight-loss Program On Mental Stress-induced Cardiovascular Responses and Recovery." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 23, no. 7-8, 2007, pp. 521-8.
Torres SJ, Nowson CA. Effect of a weight-loss program on mental stress-induced cardiovascular responses and recovery. Nutrition. 2007;23(7-8):521-8.
Torres, S. J., & Nowson, C. A. (2007). Effect of a weight-loss program on mental stress-induced cardiovascular responses and recovery. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(7-8), 521-8.
Torres SJ, Nowson CA. Effect of a Weight-loss Program On Mental Stress-induced Cardiovascular Responses and Recovery. Nutrition. 2007 Jul-Aug;23(7-8):521-8. PubMed PMID: 17560080.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of a weight-loss program on mental stress-induced cardiovascular responses and recovery. AU - Torres,Susan J, AU - Nowson,Caryl A, Y1 - 2007/06/07/ PY - 2006/08/22/received PY - 2007/04/24/revised PY - 2007/04/26/accepted PY - 2007/6/15/pubmed PY - 2007/9/15/medline PY - 2007/6/15/entrez SP - 521 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 23 IS - 7-8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We assessed the effect of weight loss on blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate during rest, psychological stress, and recovery after stress. METHODS: Two groups of men completed two mental stress tests 12 wk apart. The control group continued their usual diet, whereas the weight-loss group underwent a dietary weight-loss program in which they were randomized to a high-fruit/vegetable and low-fat dairy diet or a low-fat diet. RESULTS: Fifty-five men with a baseline BP of 125.9 +/- 6.9/83.6 +/- 7.1 mmHg (mean +/- SD) completed the study (weight-loss group, n = 28; control group, n = 27). The weight-loss group lost weight (mean +/- SEM, -4.3 +/- 0.3 versus +0.4 +/- 0.4 kg, P = 0.001) compared with controls and had a significant decrease in resting systolic BP (SBP; -2.0 +/- 1.1% versus +2.0 +/- 1.1%, P < 0.05). There was a greater decrease in SBP (P < 0.05) and pulse rate (P < 0.05) at all time points during the stress test in the weight loss compared with the control group. At week 12, SBP in 23 (82%) subjects in the weight-loss group and 24 (89%) in the control group returned to resting levels, with recovering levels in the weight-loss group returning to resting levels 6.1 +/- 2.6 min earlier than in the control group (P < 0.05). There was an overall greater decrease in diastolic BP (DBP; P < 0.05) and DBP during recovery up to 27 min after stress (P < 0.05) in the high-fruit/vegetable and low-fat dairy diet group (n = 14) compared with the low-fat diet group (n = 14). CONCLUSION: A 5% loss of weight decreased BP during rest and returned SBP to resting levels faster, thus decreasing the period of increased BP as a result of mental stress, which is likely to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease in the long term. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17560080/Effect_of_a_weight_loss_program_on_mental_stress_induced_cardiovascular_responses_and_recovery_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(07)00139-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -