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Changing environmental influences on substance use across development.
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007 Apr; 10(2):315-26.TR

Abstract

In contrast to many phenotypes that have been studied using twin designs, substance use shows considerable evidence of environmental influence. Accordingly, specifying the relevant environments and understanding the nature of their effects is an important research priority. Twin studies also have demonstrated that the importance of genetic and environmental influences varies across development for a variety of behavioral outcomes, including substance use. Here, we report analyses exploring moderating effects associated with parenting and peer characteristics on adolescent smoking and drinking, measured at ages 14 and 17. We find significant evidence of moderating effects associated with two dimensions of parenting (parental monitoring and time spent in activities with parents) on adolescent smoking, measured at two time points across development, but no moderating effects on adolescent drinking. Genetic influences on smoking increased, and common environmental effects decreased, as adolescents reported less parental monitoring and spending more time with their parents. Conversely, we find evidence that adolescent drinking is more strongly influenced by peer characteristics. The importance of genetic predispositions was increased among adolescents who reported more friends who used alcohol. These analyses illustrate the importance of incorporating measured aspects of the environment into genetically informative twin models to begin to understand how specific environments are related to various outcomes. Furthermore, they illustrate the importance of using a developmental perspective to understand how specific influences may vary across different ages, and across different phenotypes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Washington University, Department of Psychiatry, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. dickd@wustl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17564520

Citation

Dick, Danielle M., et al. "Changing Environmental Influences On Substance Use Across Development." Twin Research and Human Genetics : the Official Journal of the International Society for Twin Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, 2007, pp. 315-26.
Dick DM, Pagan JL, Viken R, et al. Changing environmental influences on substance use across development. Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007;10(2):315-26.
Dick, D. M., Pagan, J. L., Viken, R., Purcell, S., Kaprio, J., Pulkkinen, L., & Rose, R. J. (2007). Changing environmental influences on substance use across development. Twin Research and Human Genetics : the Official Journal of the International Society for Twin Studies, 10(2), 315-26.
Dick DM, et al. Changing Environmental Influences On Substance Use Across Development. Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007;10(2):315-26. PubMed PMID: 17564520.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changing environmental influences on substance use across development. AU - Dick,Danielle M, AU - Pagan,Jason L, AU - Viken,Richard, AU - Purcell,Shaun, AU - Kaprio,Jaakko, AU - Pulkkinen,Lea, AU - Rose,Richard J, PY - 2007/6/15/pubmed PY - 2007/8/7/medline PY - 2007/6/15/entrez SP - 315 EP - 26 JF - Twin research and human genetics : the official journal of the International Society for Twin Studies JO - Twin Res Hum Genet VL - 10 IS - 2 N2 - In contrast to many phenotypes that have been studied using twin designs, substance use shows considerable evidence of environmental influence. Accordingly, specifying the relevant environments and understanding the nature of their effects is an important research priority. Twin studies also have demonstrated that the importance of genetic and environmental influences varies across development for a variety of behavioral outcomes, including substance use. Here, we report analyses exploring moderating effects associated with parenting and peer characteristics on adolescent smoking and drinking, measured at ages 14 and 17. We find significant evidence of moderating effects associated with two dimensions of parenting (parental monitoring and time spent in activities with parents) on adolescent smoking, measured at two time points across development, but no moderating effects on adolescent drinking. Genetic influences on smoking increased, and common environmental effects decreased, as adolescents reported less parental monitoring and spending more time with their parents. Conversely, we find evidence that adolescent drinking is more strongly influenced by peer characteristics. The importance of genetic predispositions was increased among adolescents who reported more friends who used alcohol. These analyses illustrate the importance of incorporating measured aspects of the environment into genetically informative twin models to begin to understand how specific environments are related to various outcomes. Furthermore, they illustrate the importance of using a developmental perspective to understand how specific influences may vary across different ages, and across different phenotypes. SN - 1832-4274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17564520/Changing_environmental_influences_on_substance_use_across_development_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1832427400007854/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -