Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Gabapentin improves sleep in the presence of alcohol.
J Clin Sleep Med. 2005 Jul 15; 1(3):284-7.JC

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

To evaluate the ability of a single dose of gabapentin to improve sleep disruption caused by alcohol consumption.

METHODS

Double-blind, randomized, single-dose, crossover study of normal subjects (age 21-45 years) who were free of known sleep disorders or medical conditions that could interfere with sleep. Subjects first received baseline polysomnography and, upon awakening, subjective scales of drowsiness and functioning. One to 2 weeks later, they returned to the sleep lab. They consumed 4 ounces of 40% alcohol and gabapentin (300 or 600 mg) or placebo 1 hour prior to bedtime. Polysomnography and subjective scales were repeated. One to 2 weeks later, subjects returned and were given the same dose of alcohol and the other treatment, followed by repeat testing. Differences between baseline and placebo (alcohol) results were compared to the difference between baseline and gabapentin (alcohol) by paired t tests.

RESULTS

Thirteen subjects were enrolled; 12 completed the study. Mean age was 30.8 years (range 25-37 years). No difference in total sleep time was seen for any of the groups. Gabapentin (300 or 600 mg) showed a significant decrease in stage 1 (9.3% vs 5.5%) and number of awakenings (11 vs 6) with increased sleep efficiency (93% vs 96.2%). Subjects receiving 600 mg also showed increased slow wave sleep, decreased rapid eye movement sleep, and decreased arousals. No differences were seen in any of the subjective tests of drowsiness and performance.

CONCLUSIONS

Single-dose gabapentin at bedtime can improve sleep through decreased stage 1 sleep, increased slow-wave sleep, increased sleep efficiency, and decreased arousals. Gabapentin may be useful in the treatment of conditions in which frequent awakenings and decreased sleep efficiency are seen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA. cwb11@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17566190

Citation

Bazil, Carl W., et al. "Gabapentin Improves Sleep in the Presence of Alcohol." Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM : Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, vol. 1, no. 3, 2005, pp. 284-7.
Bazil CW, Battista J, Basner RC. Gabapentin improves sleep in the presence of alcohol. J Clin Sleep Med. 2005;1(3):284-7.
Bazil, C. W., Battista, J., & Basner, R. C. (2005). Gabapentin improves sleep in the presence of alcohol. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM : Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 1(3), 284-7.
Bazil CW, Battista J, Basner RC. Gabapentin Improves Sleep in the Presence of Alcohol. J Clin Sleep Med. 2005 Jul 15;1(3):284-7. PubMed PMID: 17566190.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gabapentin improves sleep in the presence of alcohol. AU - Bazil,Carl W, AU - Battista,Julianne, AU - Basner,Robert C, PY - 2007/6/15/pubmed PY - 2007/7/27/medline PY - 2007/6/15/entrez SP - 284 EP - 7 JF - Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine JO - J Clin Sleep Med VL - 1 IS - 3 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the ability of a single dose of gabapentin to improve sleep disruption caused by alcohol consumption. METHODS: Double-blind, randomized, single-dose, crossover study of normal subjects (age 21-45 years) who were free of known sleep disorders or medical conditions that could interfere with sleep. Subjects first received baseline polysomnography and, upon awakening, subjective scales of drowsiness and functioning. One to 2 weeks later, they returned to the sleep lab. They consumed 4 ounces of 40% alcohol and gabapentin (300 or 600 mg) or placebo 1 hour prior to bedtime. Polysomnography and subjective scales were repeated. One to 2 weeks later, subjects returned and were given the same dose of alcohol and the other treatment, followed by repeat testing. Differences between baseline and placebo (alcohol) results were compared to the difference between baseline and gabapentin (alcohol) by paired t tests. RESULTS: Thirteen subjects were enrolled; 12 completed the study. Mean age was 30.8 years (range 25-37 years). No difference in total sleep time was seen for any of the groups. Gabapentin (300 or 600 mg) showed a significant decrease in stage 1 (9.3% vs 5.5%) and number of awakenings (11 vs 6) with increased sleep efficiency (93% vs 96.2%). Subjects receiving 600 mg also showed increased slow wave sleep, decreased rapid eye movement sleep, and decreased arousals. No differences were seen in any of the subjective tests of drowsiness and performance. CONCLUSIONS: Single-dose gabapentin at bedtime can improve sleep through decreased stage 1 sleep, increased slow-wave sleep, increased sleep efficiency, and decreased arousals. Gabapentin may be useful in the treatment of conditions in which frequent awakenings and decreased sleep efficiency are seen. SN - 1550-9389 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17566190/Gabapentin_improves_sleep_in_the_presence_of_alcohol_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/sleepdisorders.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -