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Maternal work and child-care strategies in peri-urban Guatemala: nutritional effects.
Child Dev. 1991 Oct; 62(5):954-65.CD

Abstract

Associations of 293 mothers' work for earnings and child-care arrangements with the anthropometric status of their children were examined in urban Guatemala. It was hypothesized that during the period of life in which growth often falters (8 through 35 months), maternal employment could be beneficial for children. Informal workers tended to be poorer, less educated, and have more undernourished children than formal workers or nonworkers. When poverty and mother's education were controlled for, no effects of maternal employment on children's anthropometric growth patterns were seen. However, the percent of the family income the mother earned was positively associated with all anthropometric indicators, controlling for confounds. Children taken care of by preteen siblings had significantly lower weight for height than those in other situations, even controlling for SES and maternal employment status. These effects were not found in a 36-48-month-old sample.

Authors+Show Affiliations

California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1756668

Citation

Engle, P L.. "Maternal Work and Child-care Strategies in Peri-urban Guatemala: Nutritional Effects." Child Development, vol. 62, no. 5, 1991, pp. 954-65.
Engle PL. Maternal work and child-care strategies in peri-urban Guatemala: nutritional effects. Child Dev. 1991;62(5):954-65.
Engle, P. L. (1991). Maternal work and child-care strategies in peri-urban Guatemala: nutritional effects. Child Development, 62(5), 954-65.
Engle PL. Maternal Work and Child-care Strategies in Peri-urban Guatemala: Nutritional Effects. Child Dev. 1991;62(5):954-65. PubMed PMID: 1756668.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal work and child-care strategies in peri-urban Guatemala: nutritional effects. A1 - Engle,P L, PY - 1991/10/1/pubmed PY - 1991/10/1/medline PY - 1991/10/1/entrez KW - Americas KW - Anthropometry KW - Behavior KW - Biology KW - Central America KW - Child Care KW - Child Development KW - Child Nutrition KW - Child Rearing KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - Educational Status KW - Family And Household KW - Family Characteristics KW - Family Life Surveys KW - Family Relationships KW - Family Research KW - Geographic Factors KW - Guatemala KW - Health KW - Human Resources KW - Income KW - Labor Force--women KW - Latin America KW - Malnutrition KW - Measurement KW - Methodological Studies KW - Mothers KW - North America KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Nutrition Surveys KW - Parents KW - Population KW - Poverty KW - Research Methodology KW - Siblings KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Socioeconomic Status KW - Spatial Distribution KW - Urban Spatial Distribution KW - Urbanization SP - 954 EP - 65 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 62 IS - 5 N2 - Associations of 293 mothers' work for earnings and child-care arrangements with the anthropometric status of their children were examined in urban Guatemala. It was hypothesized that during the period of life in which growth often falters (8 through 35 months), maternal employment could be beneficial for children. Informal workers tended to be poorer, less educated, and have more undernourished children than formal workers or nonworkers. When poverty and mother's education were controlled for, no effects of maternal employment on children's anthropometric growth patterns were seen. However, the percent of the family income the mother earned was positively associated with all anthropometric indicators, controlling for confounds. Children taken care of by preteen siblings had significantly lower weight for height than those in other situations, even controlling for SES and maternal employment status. These effects were not found in a 36-48-month-old sample. SN - 0009-3920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1756668/Maternal_work_and_child_care_strategies_in_peri_urban_Guatemala:_nutritional_effects_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0009-3920&date=1991&volume=62&issue=5&spage=954 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -