Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reduced chemokine receptor 9 on intraepithelial lymphocytes in celiac disease suggests persistent epithelial activation.
Gastroenterology. 2007 Jun; 132(7):2371-82.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Celiac disease is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten, with increased epithelial lymphocyte infiltration in the duodenum/jejunum as a hallmark. The chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) is a small intestinal homing receptor normally found on most mucosal T cells in this organ. Because CCR9 expression appears to be activation dependent, we examined CCR9 on duodenal T cells from untreated and treated (gluten-free diet) patients with celiac disease and healthy controls.

METHODS

Duodenal biopsy specimens and blood samples were obtained for histologic analysis and flow-cytometric CCR9 analysis of isolated lymphocytes. CCR9 expression after activation was studied in peripheral blood T cells from healthy volunteers.

RESULTS

The median number of CCR9(+) cells among CD3(+) T cells in epithelium and lamina propria, respectively, was 56% and 48% in controls, 11% and 40% in treated patients, and 1% and 8% in untreated patients. Significant differences occurred between controls and treated or untreated patients in the epithelium but only between controls and untreated patients in the lamina propria (P=.008, all comparisons). No such differences were seen in peripheral blood, but stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin and, to a lesser extent, stimulation via NKG2D reduced the CCR9 expression on blood T cells.

CONCLUSIONS

CCR9 expression is reduced on epithelial and lamina propria T cells in untreated celiac disease. Down-regulation of CCR9 persists in intraepithelial T cells from well-treated patients. This suggests ongoing immune activation preferentially within the epithelium.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory for Immunohistochemistry and Immunopathology, Institute of Pathology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. richard.olaussen@ahus.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17570212

Citation

Olaussen, Richard W., et al. "Reduced Chemokine Receptor 9 On Intraepithelial Lymphocytes in Celiac Disease Suggests Persistent Epithelial Activation." Gastroenterology, vol. 132, no. 7, 2007, pp. 2371-82.
Olaussen RW, Karlsson MR, Lundin KE, et al. Reduced chemokine receptor 9 on intraepithelial lymphocytes in celiac disease suggests persistent epithelial activation. Gastroenterology. 2007;132(7):2371-82.
Olaussen, R. W., Karlsson, M. R., Lundin, K. E., Jahnsen, J., Brandtzaeg, P., & Farstad, I. N. (2007). Reduced chemokine receptor 9 on intraepithelial lymphocytes in celiac disease suggests persistent epithelial activation. Gastroenterology, 132(7), 2371-82.
Olaussen RW, et al. Reduced Chemokine Receptor 9 On Intraepithelial Lymphocytes in Celiac Disease Suggests Persistent Epithelial Activation. Gastroenterology. 2007;132(7):2371-82. PubMed PMID: 17570212.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reduced chemokine receptor 9 on intraepithelial lymphocytes in celiac disease suggests persistent epithelial activation. AU - Olaussen,Richard W, AU - Karlsson,Malin R, AU - Lundin,Knut E A, AU - Jahnsen,Jørgen, AU - Brandtzaeg,Per, AU - Farstad,Inger N, Y1 - 2007/04/18/ PY - 2005/09/05/received PY - 2007/02/22/accepted PY - 2007/6/16/pubmed PY - 2007/7/25/medline PY - 2007/6/16/entrez SP - 2371 EP - 82 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 132 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten, with increased epithelial lymphocyte infiltration in the duodenum/jejunum as a hallmark. The chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) is a small intestinal homing receptor normally found on most mucosal T cells in this organ. Because CCR9 expression appears to be activation dependent, we examined CCR9 on duodenal T cells from untreated and treated (gluten-free diet) patients with celiac disease and healthy controls. METHODS: Duodenal biopsy specimens and blood samples were obtained for histologic analysis and flow-cytometric CCR9 analysis of isolated lymphocytes. CCR9 expression after activation was studied in peripheral blood T cells from healthy volunteers. RESULTS: The median number of CCR9(+) cells among CD3(+) T cells in epithelium and lamina propria, respectively, was 56% and 48% in controls, 11% and 40% in treated patients, and 1% and 8% in untreated patients. Significant differences occurred between controls and treated or untreated patients in the epithelium but only between controls and untreated patients in the lamina propria (P=.008, all comparisons). No such differences were seen in peripheral blood, but stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin and, to a lesser extent, stimulation via NKG2D reduced the CCR9 expression on blood T cells. CONCLUSIONS: CCR9 expression is reduced on epithelial and lamina propria T cells in untreated celiac disease. Down-regulation of CCR9 persists in intraepithelial T cells from well-treated patients. This suggests ongoing immune activation preferentially within the epithelium. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17570212/Reduced_chemokine_receptor_9_on_intraepithelial_lymphocytes_in_celiac_disease_suggests_persistent_epithelial_activation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(07)00784-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -