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The relationship between child abuse and adult obesity among california women.
Am J Prev Med 2007; 33(1):28-33AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite clinical studies suggesting that child abuse is associated with adult obesity, very few studies have been conducted with large community or state-based samples. This study examines the relationship between child abuse and adult obesity, relative to other risk factors such as demographics, food insecurity, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity, in a representative sample of California women.

METHODS

Data are from the California Women's Health Survey, a state-based, random-digit-dial annual probability survey of California women. Participants included 11,115 nonpregnant women aged 18 or older, who provided complete data for all study variables. The telephone interview included assessment of child abuse (abstracted from the Traumatic Stress Schedule), food insecurity, perceived stress, physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, height, and weight. Data were collected in 2002, 2003, and 2004, and analyzed in 2006.

RESULTS

Obese (body mass index [BMI] of 30 or higher) women were significantly more likely to report exposure to child abuse (odds ratio [OR]=1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.23-1.42). In a multivariate model adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, food insecurity, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, physical inactivity, and perceived stress, women exposed to child abuse remained significantly more likely to be obese than unexposed women (adjusted OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.13-1.40). The population-attributable fraction of obesity associated with any type of abuse was 4.5% (95% CI=2.28-6.55).

CONCLUSIONS

Exposure to child abuse is associated with adult obesity among California women, even accounting for other relevant variables. This supports the notion that child abuse and its sequelae may be important targets for public health intervention, particularly in subpopulations where the prevalence of child abuse is known to be high.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Health Care Evaluation, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA. Jennifer.Alvarez@va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17572308

Citation

Alvarez, Jennifer, et al. "The Relationship Between Child Abuse and Adult Obesity Among California Women." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 33, no. 1, 2007, pp. 28-33.
Alvarez J, Pavao J, Baumrind N, et al. The relationship between child abuse and adult obesity among california women. Am J Prev Med. 2007;33(1):28-33.
Alvarez, J., Pavao, J., Baumrind, N., & Kimerling, R. (2007). The relationship between child abuse and adult obesity among california women. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 33(1), pp. 28-33.
Alvarez J, et al. The Relationship Between Child Abuse and Adult Obesity Among California Women. Am J Prev Med. 2007;33(1):28-33. PubMed PMID: 17572308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between child abuse and adult obesity among california women. AU - Alvarez,Jennifer, AU - Pavao,Joanne, AU - Baumrind,Nikki, AU - Kimerling,Rachel, PY - 2006/09/08/received PY - 2007/01/26/revised PY - 2007/02/28/accepted PY - 2007/6/19/pubmed PY - 2008/1/9/medline PY - 2007/6/19/entrez SP - 28 EP - 33 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 33 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite clinical studies suggesting that child abuse is associated with adult obesity, very few studies have been conducted with large community or state-based samples. This study examines the relationship between child abuse and adult obesity, relative to other risk factors such as demographics, food insecurity, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity, in a representative sample of California women. METHODS: Data are from the California Women's Health Survey, a state-based, random-digit-dial annual probability survey of California women. Participants included 11,115 nonpregnant women aged 18 or older, who provided complete data for all study variables. The telephone interview included assessment of child abuse (abstracted from the Traumatic Stress Schedule), food insecurity, perceived stress, physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, height, and weight. Data were collected in 2002, 2003, and 2004, and analyzed in 2006. RESULTS: Obese (body mass index [BMI] of 30 or higher) women were significantly more likely to report exposure to child abuse (odds ratio [OR]=1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.23-1.42). In a multivariate model adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, food insecurity, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, physical inactivity, and perceived stress, women exposed to child abuse remained significantly more likely to be obese than unexposed women (adjusted OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.13-1.40). The population-attributable fraction of obesity associated with any type of abuse was 4.5% (95% CI=2.28-6.55). CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to child abuse is associated with adult obesity among California women, even accounting for other relevant variables. This supports the notion that child abuse and its sequelae may be important targets for public health intervention, particularly in subpopulations where the prevalence of child abuse is known to be high. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17572308/The_relationship_between_child_abuse_and_adult_obesity_among_california_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(07)00155-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -