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Smoking as a risk factor for dementia and cognitive decline: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.
Am J Epidemiol 2007; 166(4):367-78AJ

Abstract

The authors assessed the association of smoking with dementia and cognitive decline in a meta-analysis of 19 prospective studies with at least 12 months of follow-up. Studies included a total of 26,374 participants followed for dementia for 2-30 years and 17,023 participants followed up for 2-7 years to assess cognitive decline. Mean study age was 74 years. Current smokers at baseline, relative to never smokers, had risks of 1.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.43, 2.23) for incident Alzheimer's disease, 1.78 (95% CI: 1.28, 2.47) for incident vascular dementia, and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.60) for any dementia. Compared with those who never smoked, current smokers at baseline also showed greater yearly declines in Mini-Mental State Examination scores over the follow-up period (effect size (beta)=-0.13, 95% CI: -0.18, -0.08). Compared with former smokers, current smokers at baseline showed an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (relative risk=1.70, 95% CI: 1.25, 2.31) and an increased decline in cognitive abilities (effect size (beta)=-0.07, 95% CI: -0.11, -0.03), but the groups were not different regarding risk of vascular dementia or any dementia. The authors concluded that elderly smokers have increased risks of dementia and cognitive decline.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Mental Health Research, School of Psychology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. kaarin.anstey@anu.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17573335

Citation

Anstey, Kaarin J., et al. "Smoking as a Risk Factor for Dementia and Cognitive Decline: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 166, no. 4, 2007, pp. 367-78.
Anstey KJ, von Sanden C, Salim A, et al. Smoking as a risk factor for dementia and cognitive decline: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;166(4):367-78.
Anstey, K. J., von Sanden, C., Salim, A., & O'Kearney, R. (2007). Smoking as a risk factor for dementia and cognitive decline: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. American Journal of Epidemiology, 166(4), pp. 367-78.
Anstey KJ, et al. Smoking as a Risk Factor for Dementia and Cognitive Decline: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Aug 15;166(4):367-78. PubMed PMID: 17573335.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking as a risk factor for dementia and cognitive decline: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Anstey,Kaarin J, AU - von Sanden,Chwee, AU - Salim,Agus, AU - O'Kearney,Richard, Y1 - 2007/06/14/ PY - 2007/6/19/pubmed PY - 2007/9/1/medline PY - 2007/6/19/entrez SP - 367 EP - 78 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 166 IS - 4 N2 - The authors assessed the association of smoking with dementia and cognitive decline in a meta-analysis of 19 prospective studies with at least 12 months of follow-up. Studies included a total of 26,374 participants followed for dementia for 2-30 years and 17,023 participants followed up for 2-7 years to assess cognitive decline. Mean study age was 74 years. Current smokers at baseline, relative to never smokers, had risks of 1.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.43, 2.23) for incident Alzheimer's disease, 1.78 (95% CI: 1.28, 2.47) for incident vascular dementia, and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.60) for any dementia. Compared with those who never smoked, current smokers at baseline also showed greater yearly declines in Mini-Mental State Examination scores over the follow-up period (effect size (beta)=-0.13, 95% CI: -0.18, -0.08). Compared with former smokers, current smokers at baseline showed an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (relative risk=1.70, 95% CI: 1.25, 2.31) and an increased decline in cognitive abilities (effect size (beta)=-0.07, 95% CI: -0.11, -0.03), but the groups were not different regarding risk of vascular dementia or any dementia. The authors concluded that elderly smokers have increased risks of dementia and cognitive decline. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17573335/Smoking_as_a_risk_factor_for_dementia_and_cognitive_decline:_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwm116 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -