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Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in water using TiO2 based photocatalytic and H2O2/UV processes.
J Hazard Mater. 2007 Jul 31; 146(3):496-501.JH

Abstract

1,4-dioxane is a synthetic compound found in industrial effluent and subsequently contaminates water bodies due to its high solubility and high volatility. It is of concern due to its toxic and hazardous nature and has been listed as a class 2B carcinogen. This study involved optimisation of the photocatalytic and H(2)O(2)/UVC processes for 1,4-dioxane removal. Different photocatalysts and loadings were investigated for the degradation of low concentrations of 1,4-dioxane in water including a commercial P25, a synthesised magnetic photocatalyst and an immobilised sol-gel system. A commercial catalyst (Degussa P25) was the most efficient. A lifetime study of the sol-gel reactor showed that the coating was stable over the time period studied. The optimum H(2)O(2) concentration in the H(2)O(2)/UVC process was found to be 30ppm. The addition of H(2)O(2) to the photocatalytic process for 1,4-dioxane removal caused a decrease in rate for the commercial P25 photocatalyst and an increase in rate for the lab-made magnetic photocatalyst.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Particles and Catalysis Research Group, Australian Research Council Centre for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. h.coleman@unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17574739

Citation

Coleman, H M., et al. "Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in Water Using TiO2 Based Photocatalytic and H2O2/UV Processes." Journal of Hazardous Materials, vol. 146, no. 3, 2007, pp. 496-501.
Coleman HM, Vimonses V, Leslie G, et al. Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in water using TiO2 based photocatalytic and H2O2/UV processes. J Hazard Mater. 2007;146(3):496-501.
Coleman, H. M., Vimonses, V., Leslie, G., & Amal, R. (2007). Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in water using TiO2 based photocatalytic and H2O2/UV processes. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 146(3), 496-501.
Coleman HM, et al. Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in Water Using TiO2 Based Photocatalytic and H2O2/UV Processes. J Hazard Mater. 2007 Jul 31;146(3):496-501. PubMed PMID: 17574739.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Degradation of 1,4-dioxane in water using TiO2 based photocatalytic and H2O2/UV processes. AU - Coleman,H M, AU - Vimonses,V, AU - Leslie,G, AU - Amal,R, Y1 - 2007/04/20/ PY - 2007/6/19/pubmed PY - 2007/9/28/medline PY - 2007/6/19/entrez SP - 496 EP - 501 JF - Journal of hazardous materials JO - J Hazard Mater VL - 146 IS - 3 N2 - 1,4-dioxane is a synthetic compound found in industrial effluent and subsequently contaminates water bodies due to its high solubility and high volatility. It is of concern due to its toxic and hazardous nature and has been listed as a class 2B carcinogen. This study involved optimisation of the photocatalytic and H(2)O(2)/UVC processes for 1,4-dioxane removal. Different photocatalysts and loadings were investigated for the degradation of low concentrations of 1,4-dioxane in water including a commercial P25, a synthesised magnetic photocatalyst and an immobilised sol-gel system. A commercial catalyst (Degussa P25) was the most efficient. A lifetime study of the sol-gel reactor showed that the coating was stable over the time period studied. The optimum H(2)O(2) concentration in the H(2)O(2)/UVC process was found to be 30ppm. The addition of H(2)O(2) to the photocatalytic process for 1,4-dioxane removal caused a decrease in rate for the commercial P25 photocatalyst and an increase in rate for the lab-made magnetic photocatalyst. SN - 0304-3894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17574739/Degradation_of_14_dioxane_in_water_using_TiO2_based_photocatalytic_and_H2O2/UV_processes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3894(07)00532-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -