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Effects of food form on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese young adults.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Nov; 31(11):1688-95.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the independent effect of food form on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese adults using high carbohydrate, fat or protein food stimuli.

DESIGN

Crossover dietary challenge with matched beverage and solid food forms: high carbohydrate (watermelon and watermelon juice); high protein (cheese and milk); high fat (coconut meat and coconut milk). A total of 120 lean (18-23 kg/m(2); N=60) and obese (30-35 kg/m(2); N=60) adults (18-50 years old) with stable body weight. Forty different participants (N=20 lean and 20 obese) were tested with each of the food systems.

MEASUREMENTS

Appetitive sensations, food palatability and dietary intake.

RESULTS

Regardless of the predominant energy source, the beverage food form elicited a weaker compensatory dietary response than the matched solid food form. Thus, total daily energy intake was significantly higher by 12.4, 19 and 15% on days the beverage forms of the high-carbohydrate, -fat and -protein foods were ingested, respectively. This was due more to a weak effect on satiety than satiation. The obese participants had higher energy intake at the lunch, including the beverage high-protein load, but overall differences between lean and obese participants were small and not systematic.

CONCLUSION

Food rheology exerts an independent effect on energy intake. Dietary compensation for beverages is weaker than for solid food forms of comparable nutrient content. Thus, they pose a greater risk for promoting positive energy balance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17579632

Citation

Mourao, D M., et al. "Effects of Food Form On Appetite and Energy Intake in Lean and Obese Young Adults." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 31, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1688-95.
Mourao DM, Bressan J, Campbell WW, et al. Effects of food form on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese young adults. Int J Obes (Lond). 2007;31(11):1688-95.
Mourao, D. M., Bressan, J., Campbell, W. W., & Mattes, R. D. (2007). Effects of food form on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese young adults. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 31(11), 1688-95.
Mourao DM, et al. Effects of Food Form On Appetite and Energy Intake in Lean and Obese Young Adults. Int J Obes (Lond). 2007;31(11):1688-95. PubMed PMID: 17579632.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of food form on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese young adults. AU - Mourao,D M, AU - Bressan,J, AU - Campbell,W W, AU - Mattes,R D, Y1 - 2007/06/19/ PY - 2007/6/21/pubmed PY - 2008/4/15/medline PY - 2007/6/21/entrez SP - 1688 EP - 95 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 31 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the independent effect of food form on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese adults using high carbohydrate, fat or protein food stimuli. DESIGN: Crossover dietary challenge with matched beverage and solid food forms: high carbohydrate (watermelon and watermelon juice); high protein (cheese and milk); high fat (coconut meat and coconut milk). A total of 120 lean (18-23 kg/m(2); N=60) and obese (30-35 kg/m(2); N=60) adults (18-50 years old) with stable body weight. Forty different participants (N=20 lean and 20 obese) were tested with each of the food systems. MEASUREMENTS: Appetitive sensations, food palatability and dietary intake. RESULTS: Regardless of the predominant energy source, the beverage food form elicited a weaker compensatory dietary response than the matched solid food form. Thus, total daily energy intake was significantly higher by 12.4, 19 and 15% on days the beverage forms of the high-carbohydrate, -fat and -protein foods were ingested, respectively. This was due more to a weak effect on satiety than satiation. The obese participants had higher energy intake at the lunch, including the beverage high-protein load, but overall differences between lean and obese participants were small and not systematic. CONCLUSION: Food rheology exerts an independent effect on energy intake. Dietary compensation for beverages is weaker than for solid food forms of comparable nutrient content. Thus, they pose a greater risk for promoting positive energy balance. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17579632/Effects_of_food_form_on_appetite_and_energy_intake_in_lean_and_obese_young_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803667 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -